Amazon Therapeutic Labs Guayusa Leaves Wildcrafted Cut & Sifted Bulk 1 lb.

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Can lower blood sugar levels
Organic No Animal Testing Non Irradiated. No Irradiation. Vegetarian

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Product Description - Amazon Therapeutic Labs Guayusa Leaves Wildcrafted Cut & Sifted Bulk 1 lb.

Hoxsey Red Clover Burdock Plus Blood Cleansing Herbal Formula

Guayusa Herb formerly Qat Tea Ilex guayusa

This certified Kosher herb, known as stimulating Amazon tea, is used by the Tappipiscu and Qechua tribes to enhance energy and metabolism. It provides long-lasting energy and alertness. Said to increase sexual potency, it is also used to enhance dreams. The presence of guanadine can lower blood sugar levels, thus making it popular with diabetics(1). Small amounts can be highly stimulating for most people.

Guayusa is a tree that grows under the canopy of the Amazon Rainforest in the regions of Ecuador, Peru, and Colombia. Once wild grown, this species is now thought of as a cultivated plant. The botanical cousin of Yerba Mate, the leaves of the Guayusa tree contain natural caffeine as well as theobromine (commonly found in chocolate) and L-theanine (an amino acid found in green tea recognized to reduce physical and mental stress).Boy with Guayusa formerly Qat Tea Plant

Dating back over 2,000 years, Guayusa has been used by indigenous families in the Amazon Rainforest for several purposes. Traditionally some tribes would rise early and talk over a fire while sipping Guayusa. Dreams would be interpreted and stories would be told. Hunters would drink before a night hunt to heighten their awareness earning Guayusa the nickname "The Night Watchman" by the Jivaro tribe.

Containing no tannins, Guayusa does not have the bitter taste associated with many caffeinated teas. It has a smooth taste and provides balanced energy without the crash associated with most energy drinks.

Suggested Use: Guayusa is a full spectrum botanical tea that can be extracted in heated water. Add one teaspoon of dried herb to 16 fl. oz. of boiling water for 2 servings. Stir in herbs and remove from heat. Allow to steep until fully colored and flavored with the essence of the herb (at least 5 minutes). Strain and sweeten if desired. Serve warm or allow to cool and store in the refrigerator.

Caution: Use under care or advice of a medical practitioner. Not intended for long-term therapy.

Contraindications: May lower blood sugar levels.

Third Party Testing is performed on all herbs to ensure the highest quality available.

More About Guayusa Herb

From the Wikipedia online:
Ilex guayusa is a tree of the holly genus, native to the Ecuadorian Amazon Rainforest. It is a distant relative of both Yerba Mate and Yaupon Holly, used to make the black drink. The leaves have the highest caffeine content of any known plant.
The leaves are boiled to produce a tea; due to the high caffeine content, the same leaves are often used multiple times, sometimes for several days. Fresh leaves are used as well as dried leaves, which are dried in rolls and strung together as a wreath resembling a Hawaiian lei.
In addition to the stimulant effects, the tea is used to enhance dream recall. To achieve this effect, it is believed that the tea must be drunk consistently in the early morning, just after waking, before the sunrise. For many Ecuadorian indigenous, the morning drinking of guayusa is a social ritual.
In areas in which it grows, it is also a common admixture to the powerful entheogenic brew ayahuasca; it is added both in addition to the more common DMT containing plants as well as in the place of them. According to the Ecuadorian indigenous, it is also slightly hallucinogenic on its own, when drunk in high enough quantities.
Pendell, Dale. PharmakoDynamis, Mercury House:San Francisco, 2002. ISBN 1562791257

1. Glycaemic effects of traditional European plant treatments for diabetes. Studies in normal and streptozotocin diabetic mice.
Swanston-Flatt SK, Day C, Flatt PR, Gould BJ, Bailey CJ.
Department of Biochemistry, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.
Diabetes Res. 1989 Feb;10(2):69-73.
PMID2743711 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2. Amazonian ethnobotany and the search for new drugs.
Schultes RE.
Botanical Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138.
Ciba Found Symp. 1994;185:106-12; discussion 112-5.
Publication TypesReview
PMID7736849 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. Ritualistic use of the holly Ilex guayusa by Amazonian Jivaro Indians.
Lewis WH, Kennelly EJ, Bass GN, Wedner HJ, Elvin-Lewis MP, Fast D.
Department of Biology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130.
J Ethnopharmacol. 1991 May-Jun;33(1-2):25-30. Erratum inJ Ethnopharmacol 1991 Sep;34(2-3):293.
PMID1682531 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

4. A multidisciplinary overview of intoxicating snuff rituals in the western hemisphere.
de Smet PA.
J Ethnopharmacol. 1985 Mar;13(1):3-49. Related Articles, Links
Publication TypesReview,
PMID3887041 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

1. Glycaemic effects of traditional European plant treatments for diabetes. Studies in normal and streptozotocin diabetic mice.
Swanston-Flatt SK, Day C, Flatt PR, Gould BJ, Bailey CJ.
Department of Biochemistry, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.
Diabetes Res. 1989 Feb;10(2):69-73.
Twelve plants used for the traditional treatment of diabetes mellitus in northern Europe were studied using normal and streptozotocin diabetic mice to evaluate effects on glucose homeostasis. The plants were administered in the diet (6.25% by weight) and/or as decoctions or infusions in place of drinking water, to coincide with the traditional method of preparation. Treatment for 28 days with preparations of burdock (Arctium lappa), cashew (Anacardium occidentale), dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), elder (Sambucus nigra), fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum), guayusa (Ilex guayusa), hop (Humulus lupulus), nettle (Urtica dioica), cultivated mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus), sage (Salvia officinale), and wild carrot (Daucus carrota) did not affect the parameters of glucose homeostasis examined in normal mice (basal plasma glucose and insulin, glucose tolerance, insulin-induced hypoglycaemia and glycated haemoglobin). After administration of streptozotocin (200 mg/kg) burdock and nettle aggravated the diabetic condition, while cashew, dandelion, elder, fenugreek, hop, periwinkle, sage and wild carrot did not significantly affect the parameters of glucose homeostasis studied (basal glucose and insulin, insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, glycated haemoglobin and pancreatic insulin concentration). Guayusa and mushroom retarded the development of hyperglycaemia in streptozotocin diabetes and reduced the hyperphagia, polydipsia, body weight loss, and glycated haemoglobin. Mushroom also countered the initial reduction in plasma insulin and the reduction in pancreatic insulin concentration, and improved the hypoglycaemic effect of exogenous insulin. These studies suggest the presence of potentially useful antidiabetic agents in guayusa and mushroom.
PMID2743711 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2. Amazonian ethnobotany and the search for new drugs.
Schultes RE.
Botanical Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138.
Ciba Found Symp. 1994;185:106-12; discussion 112-5.
Tropical rain forests offer enormous prospects for the discovery of new drugs for use in Western medicine. The Amazon supports 80,000 species of higher plants and a diverse Indian population. Focusing attention on those plants used as medicines by indigenous peoples is the most efficient way of identifying the plants that contain bioactive compounds. There is an urgent need for more ethnobotanists and ethnopharmacologists to be trained to document as much information as possible before it and the plants are lost through destruction of the rain forest and acculturation of the indigenous peoples. Ethnobotanical studies have identified plants documented by early travellers; these include Paullinia yoco and Ilex guayusa which are used as stimulants and have been shown to be rich in caffeine. Studies of the hallucinogen prepared from Banisterioposis caapi have shown that the native people know which plants to add to the mixture to lengthen and intensify the intoxication produced by the beta-carboline alkaloids in the plant. Three major snuffs are used in the Amazonia; the plants from which they are derived have been identified. One of the snuffs also has antifungal and curare-like activities; chemical analysis on the active principles has not been done. Several plants are considered as prime candidates for scientific study as sources of useful chemicals for medicine or industry. These include some used to prepare teas or other infusions for treatment of various symptoms of senile dementia.
Publication TypesReview
PMID7736849 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. Ritualistic use of the holly Ilex guayusa by Amazonian Jivaro Indians.
Lewis WH, Kennelly EJ, Bass GN, Wedner HJ, Elvin-Lewis MP, Fast D.
Department of Biology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130.
J Ethnopharmacol. 1991 May-Jun;33(1-2):25-30. Erratum inJ Ethnopharmacol 1991 Sep;34(2-3):293.
In Amazonian Peru and Ecuador leaf decoctions of the rainforest holly Ilex guayusa with high caffeine concentrations are used as a morning stimulant. After daily ingestion, ritualistic vomiting by male Achuar Indians, better known as Jivaros, reduces excessive caffeine intake, so that blood levels of caffeine and biotransformed dimethylxanthines do not cause undesirable CNS and other effects. Emesis is learned and apparently not due to emetic compounds.
PMID1682531 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

4. A multidisciplinary overview of intoxicating snuff rituals in the western hemisphere.
de Smet PA.
J Ethnopharmacol. 1985 Mar;13(1):3-49. Related Articles, Links
Part one of the paper discusses ethnobotanical, chemical and general pharmacological aspects of intoxicating snuff rituals in the western hemisphere. Four categories of ritual snuff ingredients arise from this multidisciplinary approach It is well established that the plant contains one or more psychoactive principles and the Indian use of the plant as a ritual snuff ingredient is confirmed or quite probable Anadenanthera, Erythroxylum, Nicotiana, Virola; It is well established that the plant contains one or more psychoactive principles, but the Indian use of the plant as a ritual snuff ingredient is not well recorded or even unlikely Banisteriopsis, Cannabis, Datura, Ilex guayusa; The Indian use of the plant as a ritual snuff ingredient is confirmed or quite probable, but it is not well established that the plant contains one or more psychoactive principles Justicia pectoralis, Pagamea macrophylla, Tanaecium nocturnum; The Indian use of the plant as a ritual snuff ingredient is not well recorded, and it is not well established that the plant contains one or more psychoactive principles Acorus calamus, Capsicum, Macquira sclerophylla, Piper interitum. Part two of the paper discusses the nasal pharmacokinetics and efficacy of possible ritual snuff constituents. The literature yields convincing clinical evidence that atropine, cocaine, nicotine and scopolamine are effective following nasal application, but experimental confirmation of the efficacy of nasal tryptamine alkaloids is still awaited. In self-experiments, 6.4 mg/kg of caffeine produced substantial plasma levels via the nasal route, but 0.5 mg/kg of harmine did not produce measurable plasma levels, when taken as a nasal powder. Without additional experiments, it is difficult to give a definite explanation for this negative result.
Publication TypesReview,
PMID3887041 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Disclaimer Statements on this page have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Information on this publication should not be used as medical advice. Data provided for research and professional use only.

Additional Information

Manufacturer Amazon Therapeutic Labs
SKU ha-guayusa-bulk
Product Type Cut & Sifted Herbs
Volume 1lb.

Amazon Therapeutic Labs

The HERBS AMERICA COMPANY and MACA MAGIC were founded by Jerome River Black. He was the first to cultivate and distribute live maca root plants in the USA and began germplasm collections and cultivar selection of maca in the Peruvian Altiplano in 1994. In addition to his studies of maca in the Peruvian highlands, Jerome is a published ethnobotanist with a myriad of expertise and an extensive history of working within a variety of botanical experiences. He has explored remote rivers, lakes, and forests in dozens of exotic countries, his travels having taken him to the depths of steamy jungles and the tops of 20 thousand foot mountains...

He is the award winner of the Natural Foods Institute "Best New Plants" Award and the subject of numerous articles about plant exploration. He regularly lectures and teaches others about new and rare foodcrop development. Jerry currently resides with his family in the lovely rural area of Murphy, Oregon, surrounded by acres of land containing thousands of varrieties of rare plants from around the world.

Over the course of nearly 20 years, HERBS AMERICA'S founders have used USDA agriculture and agro forestry permits to develop more than 400 rare fruits and new superfoods for introduction into the farming sector and natural foods market. To accomplish this HERBS AMERICA works directly with botanists, tribal leaders, universities, and laboratories to cultivate and research traditional medicines which are found to be beneficial for both humans and the land. Our goal is to bring equitability to small farming operations in developing countries and support indigenous populations in their efforts of preserving culture and environment while at the same time supporting agrarian economies. Working in more than thirty countries around the world, the company donates and exports fruit trees and vegetable seeds to dozens of farmers in countries on several continents.

Our long term philosopy commits us to our product lines long after they leave the farms and jungles. We like to say: "Eat well! Think well! Live close to nature and work for the good of the community!" We believe that traditional wisdom and modern science can combine important resources for a long term vision of biological health. We are adamant in our support of indigenous land rights and sustainable agriculture. A portion of our company's annual budget is designated to help protect natural heritage through conservation projects.

Herbs America Company/ ATL
P.O. Box 411, Murphy, Oregon 
USA - 97533
Tel. +1 541-846-6222
Fax: +1 541-846-9488
http://www.amazonmedicine.com

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