Amazon Therapeutic Labs Vassourinha Herb Cut & Sifted Bulk 1 lb.

Item #: HA-VASSOURINHALB

Regular Price: $74.99 Nature's Price $64.00
Save 15%

Availability:

Kills viruses, germs, fungi and bacteria
Organic No Animal Testing Non Irradiated. No Irradiation. Vegetarian

Frequently Bought Together

Product Description - Amazon Therapeutic Labs Vassourinha Herb Cut & Sifted Bulk 1 lb.

Hoxsey Red Clover Burdock Plus Blood Cleansing Herbal Formula

Vassourinha (uco Pichana) - Soparia dulcis (Scrophulariaceae)

Synonyms: Ñucño Pichana
One of our favorite Amazon herbs! This plant finds traditional use in treating upper respiratory ailments, biliary colic, congestion and menstrual disorders. It also acts as an analgesic for swelling, aches and pains and an antispasmodic2. Research has shown it to be an effective anticancer and antitumoral4. It is also used to treat fevers and mucus build up. Kills viruses, germs, fungi and bacteria. Strengthens the heart and lowers blood pressure. A great general tonic loved by many.

Suggested Use Liquids: Use 10-20 drops mixed with water two to three times daily as recommended by a practitioner.

Suggested Use Capsules: Two capsules once or twice daily.

Suggested Use Tea: One tsp loose leaf per 16 oz of boiling water.

Cautions:Use under care or advice of a medical practitioner. Not intended for long term therapy.

Contraindications: None documented, however, should not be taken during pregnancy due to its traditional use as an abortive and/or childbirth aid. It is possible it may perpetuate the affect of barbituates and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (antidepressants). May lower blood sugar levels. Diabetics should check their blood glucose levels closely if using Vassourinha.

Ingredients:Extracted in distilled water and 40% organic grain alcohol. Full spectrum powders are in vegetable capsules.

 

More About Vassourinha

1. Acetylated flavonoid glycosides potentiating NGF action from Scoparia dulcis.
Li Y, Chen X, Satake M, Oshima Y, Ohizumi Y.
Department of Pharmaceutical Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578, Japan.
J Nat Prod. 2004 Apr;67(4):725-7.
PMID15104516 [PubMed - in process]

2. Analgesic activity of a triterpene isolated from Scoparia dulcis L. (Vassourinha (NP)).
Freire SM, Torres LM, Roque NF, Souccar C, Lapa AJ.
Departamento de Fisiologia, UFMA, Sao Luis, Brasil.
PMID1841990 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. Analgesic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory principle from Scoparia dulcis.
Ahmed M, Shikha HA, Sadhu SK, Rahman MT, Datta BK.
Department of Pharmacy, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh. mua@du.bangla.net
Pharmazie. 2001 Aug;56(8):657-60.
PMID11534346 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4. Antitumor-promoting activity of scopadulcic acid B, isolated from the medicinal plant Scoparia dulcis L.
Nishino H, Hayashi T, Arisawa M, Satomi Y, Iwashima A.
Department of Biochemistry, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Japan.
Oncology. 1993 Mar-Apr;50(2):100-3.
PMID11534346 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Oncology. 1993 Mar-Apr;50(2):100-3.

5. In vitro and in vivo antiviral activity of scopadulcic acid B from Scoparia dulcis, Scrophulariaceae, against herpes simplex virus type 1.
Hayashi K, Niwayama S, Hayashi T, Nago R, Ochiai H, Morita N.
Department of Virology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sugitani, Japan.
Antiviral Res. 1988 Sep;9(6):345-54.
PMID2852487 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6. In vitro and in vivo antiviral activity of scopadulcic acid B from Scoparia dulcis, Scrophulariaceae, against herpes simplex virus type 1.
Hayashi K, Niwayama S, Hayashi T, Nago R, Ochiai H, Morita N.
Department of Virology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sugitani, Japan.
Antiviral Res. 1988 Sep;9(6):345-54.
PMID2852487 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7. Antiviral agents of plant origin. III. Scopadulin, a novel tetracyclic diterpene from Scoparia dulcis L.
Hayashi T, Kawasaki M, Miwa Y, Taga T, Morita N.
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Japan.
hem Pharm Bull (Tokyo). 1990 Apr;38(4):945-7.
PMID2379289 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8. Cytotoxic diterpenes from Scoparia dulcis.
Ahsan M, Islam SK, Gray AI, Stimson WH.
Department of Pharmacy and Institute of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh. monira@smpt.udhaka.net
J Nat Prod. 2003 Jul;66(7):958-61.
PMID12880314 [PubMed - in process]

9. A cytotoxic flavone from Scoparia dulcis L.
Hayashi T, Uchida K, Hayashi K, Niwayama S, Morita N.
Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo). 1988 Dec;36(12):4849-51.
PMID3246045 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

10. Effect of an aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis on blood glucose, plasma insulin and some polyol pathway enzymes in experimental rat diabetes.
Latha M, Pari L.
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India.
Braz J Med Biol Res. 2004 Apr;37(4):577-86. Epub 2004 Mar 23.
PMID15064821 [PubMed - in process]

11. Efficacy of scopadulcic acid A against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro.
Riel MA, Kyle DE, Milhous WK.
Department of Parasitology, Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910-7500, USA. Michael.riel@na.amedd.army.mil
J Nat Prod. 2002 Apr;65(4):614-5
PMID11975516 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

12. Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Scoparia dulcis Extract.
Babincova M, Sourivong P.
Department of Biophysics and Chemical Physics, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia.
J Med Food. 2001 Autumn;4(3):179-181.
PMID12639412 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

13. Hypoglycaemic activity of Scopariadulcis L. extract in alloxan induced hyperglycaemic rats.
Pari L, Venkateswaran S.
Department of Biochemistry, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar - 608 002, Tamil Nadu, India. paribala@sancharnet.in
Phytother Res. 2002 Nov;16(7):662-4.
PMID12410548 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

14. In vitro and in vivo antiviral activity of scopadulcic acid B from Scoparia dulcis, Scrophulariaceae, against herpes simplex virus type 1.
Hayashi K, Niwayama S, Hayashi T, Nago R, Ochiai H, Morita N.
Department of Virology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sugitani, Japan.
Antiviral Res. 1988 Sep;9(6):345-54
PMID2852487 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

15. Modulatory effect of Scoparia dulcis in oxidative stress-induced lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin diabetic rats.
Latha M, Pari L.
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar, Tamil Nadu, India.
Med Food. 2003 Winter;6(4):379-86
PMID14977448 [PubMed - in process]

16. In vitro and in vivo study of the clastogenicity of the flavone cirsitakaoside extracted from Scoparia dulcis L. (Scrophulariaceae).
Pereira-Martins SR, Takahashi CS, Tavares DC, Torres LM.
Department of Biology, Federal University of Maranhao, Sao Luis, MA. Brazil. smartins@rgm.fmrp.usp.br
Teratog Carcinog Mutagen. 1998;18(6):293-302.
PMID10052564 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

17. Reversible inhibitions of gastric H+,K(+)-ATPase by scopadulcic acid B and diacetyl scopadol. New biochemical tools of H+,K(+)-ATPase.
Asano S, Mizutani M, Hayashi T, Morita N, Takeguchi N.
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Japan.
J Biol Chem. 1990 Dec 25;265(36):22167-73.
PMID2176205 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

18. Scopadulcic acid B, a new tetracyclic diterpenoid from Scoparia dulcis L. Its structure, H+, K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase inhibitory activity and pharmacokinetic behaviour in rats.
Hayashi T, Okamura K, Kakemi M, Asano S, Mizutani M, Takeguchi N, Kawasaki M, Tezuka Y, Kikuchi T, Morita N.
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Japan.
Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo). 1990 Oct;38(10):2740-5.
PMID1963813 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

19. Efficacy of scopadulcic acid A against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro.
Riel MA, Kyle DE, Milhous WK.
Department of Parasitology, Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910-7500, USA. Michael.riel@na.amedd.army.mil
J Nat Prod. 2002 Apr;65(4):614-5.
PMID11975516 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

20. Scopadulciol, an inhibitor of gastric H+, K(+)-ATPase from Scoparia dulcis, and its structure-activity relationships.
Hayashi T, Asano S, Mizutani M, Takeguchi N, Kojima T, Okamura K, Morita N.
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Japan.
J Nat Prod. 1991 May-Jun;54(3):802-9.
PMID1659612 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE}

21. Scoparic acid A, a beta-glucuronidase inhibitor from Scoparia dulcis.
Hayashi T, Kawasaki M, Okamura K, Tamada Y, Morita N, Tezuka Y, Kikuchi T, Miwa Y, Taga T.
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Japan.
J Nat Prod. 1992 Dec;55(12):1748-55.
PMID1294695 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

22. Sympathomimetic effects of Scoparia dulcis L. and catecholamines isolated from plant extracts.
Freire SM, Torres LM, Souccar C, Lapa AJ.
Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Department of Pharmacology, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.
J Pharm Pharmacol. 1996 Jun;48(6):624-8.
PMID8832498 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

23. Medicinal plants used for dogs in Trinidad and Tobago.
Lans C, Harper T, Georges K, Bridgewater E.
Faculty of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of the West Indies, Mt. Hope, Trinidad and Tobago. cher2lans@netscape.net
Prev Vet Med. 2000 Jun 12;45(3-4):201-20.
Publication TypesReview Review, Tutorial

1. Acetylated flavonoid glycosides potentiating NGF action from Scoparia dulcis.
Li Y, Chen X, Satake M, Oshima Y, Ohizumi Y.
Department of Pharmaceutical Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578, Japan.
J Nat Prod. 2004 Apr;67(4):725-7.
Three new acetylated flavonoid glycosides, 5,6,4-trihydroxyflavone 7-O-alpha-L-2,3-di-O-acetylrhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1), apigenin 7-O-alpha-L-3-O-acetylrhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2), and apigenin 7-O-alpha-L-2,3-di-O-acetylrhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), were isolated from Scoparia dulcis together with the known compound eugenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside (4). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses. Compounds 2 and 3 showed an enhancing activity of nerve growth factor-mediated neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells.
PMID15104516 [PubMed - in process]

2. Analgesic activity of a triterpene isolated from Scoparia dulcis L. (Vassourinha (NP)).
Freire SM, Torres LM, Roque NF, Souccar C, Lapa AJ.
Departamento de Fisiologia, UFMA, Sao Luis, Brasil.
Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of water (WE) and ethanolic (EE) extracts of Scoparia dulcis L. were investigated in rats and mice, and compared to the effects induced by Glutinol, a triterpene isolated by purification of EE. Oral administration (p.o.) of either WE or EE (up to 2 g/kg) did not alter the normal spontaneous activity of mice and rats. The sleeping time induced by sodium pentobarbital (50 mg/kg, i.p.) was prolonged by 2 fold in mice pretreated with 0.5 g/kg EE, p.o. Neither extract altered the tail flick response of mice in immersion test, but previous administration of EE (0.5 g/kg, p.o.) reduced writhings induced by 0.8% acetic acid (0.1 ml/10 g, i.p.) in mice by 47%. EE (0.5 and 1 g/kg, p.o.) inhibited the paw edema induced by carrageenan in rats by respectively 46% and 58% after 2 h, being ineffective on the paw edema induced by dextran. No significant analgesic or anti-edema effects were detected in animals pretreated with WE (1 g/kg, p.o.). Administration of Glutinol (30 mg/kg, p.o.) reduced writhing induced by acetic acid in mice by 40% and the carrageenan induced paw edema in rats by 73%. The results indicate that the analgesic activity of S. dulcis L. may be explained by an anti-inflammatory activity probably related to the triterpene Glutinol.
PMID1841990 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. Analgesic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory principle from Scoparia dulcis.
Ahmed M, Shikha HA, Sadhu SK, Rahman MT, Datta BK.
Department of Pharmacy, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh. mua@du.bangla.net
Pharmazie. 2001 Aug;56(8):657-60.
Scoparinol, a diterpene, isolated from Scoparia dulcis showed significant analgesic (p < 0.001) and anti-inflammatory activity (p < 0.01) in animals. A sedative action of scoparinol was demonstrated by a marked potentiation of pentobarbital-induced sedation with a significant effect on both onset and duration of sleep (p < 0.05). Measurement of urine volume after administration of scoparinol indicated its significant diuretic action.
PMID11534346 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4. Antitumor-promoting activity of scopadulcic acid B, isolated from the medicinal plant Scoparia dulcis L.
Nishino H, Hayashi T, Arisawa M, Satomi Y, Iwashima A.
Department of Biochemistry, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Japan.
Oncology. 1993 Mar-Apr;50(2):100-3.
Scopadulcic acid B (SDB), a tetracyclic diterpenoid isolated from a medicinal plant, Scoparia dulcis L., inhibited the effects of tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in vitro and in vivo; SDB inhibited TPA-enhanced phospholipid synthesis in cultured cells, and also suppressed the promoting effect of TPA on skin tumor formation in mice initiated with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene. The potency of SDB proved to be stronger than that of other natural antitumor-promoting terpenoids, such as glycyrrhetinic acid.
PMID8451033 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5. In vitro and in vivo antiviral activity of scopadulcic acid B from Scoparia dulcis, Scrophulariaceae, against herpes simplex virus type 1.
Hayashi K, Niwayama S, Hayashi T, Nago R, Ochiai H, Morita N.
Department of Virology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sugitani, Japan.
Antiviral Res. 1988 Sep;9(6):345-54.
The antiviral activity of five diterpenoids isolated from Scoparia dulcis L., Scrophulariaceae, was examined in vitro against herpes simplex virus type 1. Among these compounds, only scopadulcic acid B was found to inhibit the viral replication with the in vitro therapeutic index of 16.7. The action of scopadulcic acid B was not due to a direct virucidal effect or inhibition of virus attachment to host cells. Single-cycle replication experiments indicated that the compound interfered with considerably early events of virus growth. The influence of scopadulcic acid B on the course of the primary corneal herpes simplex virus infection was investigated by means of a hamster test model. When the treatment was initiated immediately after virus inoculation, scopadulcic acid B, when applied orally or intraperitoneally, effectively prolonged both the appearance of herpetic lesions and the survival time at the dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg per day.
PMID2852487 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6. In vitro and in vivo antiviral activity of scopadulcic acid B from Scoparia dulcis, Scrophulariaceae, against herpes simplex virus type 1.
Hayashi K, Niwayama S, Hayashi T, Nago R, Ochiai H, Morita N.
Department of Virology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sugitani, Japan.
Antiviral Res. 1988 Sep;9(6):345-54.
The antiviral activity of five diterpenoids isolated from Scoparia dulcis L., Scrophulariaceae, was examined in vitro against herpes simplex virus type 1. Among these compounds, only scopadulcic acid B was found to inhibit the viral replication with the in vitro therapeutic index of 16.7. The action of scopadulcic acid B was not due to a direct virucidal effect or inhibition of virus attachment to host cells. Single-cycle replication experiments indicated that the compound interfered with considerably early events of virus growth. The influence of scopadulcic acid B on the course of the primary corneal herpes simplex virus infection was investigated by means of a hamster test model. When the treatment was initiated immediately after virus inoculation, scopadulcic acid B, when applied orally or intraperitoneally, effectively prolonged both the appearance of herpetic lesions and the survival time at the dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg per day.
PMID2852487 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7. Antiviral agents of plant origin. III. Scopadulin, a novel tetracyclic diterpene from Scoparia dulcis L.
Hayashi T, Kawasaki M, Miwa Y, Taga T, Morita N.
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Japan.
hem Pharm Bull (Tokyo). 1990 Apr;38(4):945-7.
The structure and stereochemistry of scopadulin, a novel aphidicolane-type diterpene isolated from Scoparia dulcis L. have been established from spectral data and single-crystal X-ray analysis of its acetone solvate.
PMID2379289 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8. Cytotoxic diterpenes from Scoparia dulcis.
Ahsan M, Islam SK, Gray AI, Stimson WH.
Department of Pharmacy and Institute of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh. monira@smpt.udhaka.net
J Nat Prod. 2003 Jul;66(7):958-61.
Four new labdane-derived diterpenes, iso-dulcinol (1), 4-epi-scopadulcic acid B (2), dulcidiol (4), and scopanolal (5), together with two known diterpenes, dulcinol/scopadulciol (3) and scopadiol (6), were isolated from the aerial parts of Scoparia dulcis. The structures were determined by extensive NMR studies. The crude extracts as well as the pure diterpenes showed cytotoxicity against a panel of six human stomach cancer cell lines.
PMID12880314 [PubMed - in process]

9. A cytotoxic flavone from Scoparia dulcis L.
Hayashi T, Uchida K, Hayashi K, Niwayama S, Morita N.
Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo). 1988 Dec;36(12):4849-51.
PMID3246045 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

10. Effect of an aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis on blood glucose, plasma insulin and some polyol pathway enzymes in experimental rat diabetes.
Latha M, Pari L.
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India.
Braz J Med Biol Res. 2004 Apr;37(4):577-86. Epub 2004 Mar 23.
The effects of an aqueous extract of the plant Scoparia dulcis (200 mg/kg) on the polyol pathway and lipid peroxidation were examined in the liver of streptozotocin adult diabetic male albino Wistar rats. The diabetic control rats (N = 6) presented a significant increase in blood glucose, sorbitol dehydrogenase, glycosylated hemoglobin and lipid peroxidation markers such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and hydroperoxides, and a significant decrease in plasma insulin and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and reduced glutathione (GSH) compared to normal rats (N = 6). Scoparia dulcis plant extract (SPEt, 200 mg kg-1 day-1) and glibenclamide (600 microg kg-1 day-1), a reference drug, were administered by gavage for 6 weeks to diabetic rats (N = 6 for each group) and significantly reduced blood glucose, sorbitol dehydrogenase, glycosylated hemoglobin, TBARS, and hydroperoxides, and significantly increased plasma insulin, GPx, GST and GSH activities in liver. The effect of the SPEt was compared with that of glibenclamide. The effect of the extract may have been due to the decreased influx of glucose into the polyol pathway leading to increased activities of antioxidant enzymes and plasma insulin and decreased activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase. These results indicate that the SPEt was effective in attenuating hyperglycemia in rats and their susceptibility to oxygen free radicals.
PMID15064821 [PubMed - in process]

11. Efficacy of scopadulcic acid A against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro.
Riel MA, Kyle DE, Milhous WK.
Department of Parasitology, Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910-7500, USA. Michael.riel@na.amedd.army.mil
J Nat Prod. 2002 Apr;65(4):614-5
Scoparia dulcis is a perennial herb widely distributed in many tropical countries. It is used as an herbal remedy for gastrointestinal and many other ailments, and in Nicaragua extracts are used to treat malaria. Phytochemical screening has shown that scopadulcic acid A (SDA), scopadulcic acid B (SDB), and semisynthetic analogues are pharmacologically active compounds from S. dulcis. SDB has antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1, antitumor activity in various human cell lines, and direct inhibitory activity against porcine gastric H(+), K(+)-ATPase. A methyl ester of scopadulcic acid B showed the most potent inhibitory activity against gastric proton pumps of 30 compounds tested in one study. Compounds with antiviral, antifungal, and antitumor activity often show activity against Plasmodium falciparum. In P. falciparum, the plasma membrane and food vacuole have H(+)-ATPases and the acidocalcisome has an H(+)-Ppase. These proton pumps are potential targets for antimalarial therapy and may have their function disrupted by compounds known to inhibit gastric proton pumps. We tested pure SDA and found in vitro activity against P. falciparum with an IC(50) of 27 and 19 microM against the D6 and W2 clones, respectively. The IC(50) against the multidrug-resistant isolate, TM91C235, was 23 microM.
PMID11975516 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

12. Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Scoparia dulcis Extract.
Babincova M, Sourivong P.
Department of Biophysics and Chemical Physics, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia.
J Med Food. 2001 Autumn;4(3):179-181.
We studied the scavenging capabilities of an extract of Scoparia dulcis (a cosmopolitan weed widespread in Laos and Vietnam) for 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and measured hemoglobin-catalyzed linoleic acid peroxidation with an oxygen electrode. Our results demonstrated strong antioxidant activity corresponding to mitigation of the generation of hydroxyl radicals, a possible rationale for the observed therapeutic effects of this weed.
PMID12639412 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

13. Hypoglycaemic activity of Scopariadulcis L. extract in alloxan induced hyperglycaemic rats.
Pari L, Venkateswaran S.
Department of Biochemistry, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar - 608 002, Tamil Nadu, India. paribala@sancharnet.in
Phytother Res. 2002 Nov;16(7):662-4.
Scoparia dulcis L. commonly known as Sweet Broomweed is widely used in Indian folk medicine for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Oral administration of 0.15, 0.30 and 0.45 g/kg body weight of the aqueous extract of the Scoparia dulcis leaves (SLEt) for 45 days resulted in a significant reduction in blood glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin and an increase in total haemoglobin but in the case of 0.45 g/kg body weight the effect was highly significant. The aqueous extract also prevented a decrease in the body weight. An oral glucose tolerance test was also performed in experimental diabetic rats, in which there was a significant improvement in glucose tolerance in animals treated with SLEt and the effect was comparable to that of glibenclamide. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PMID12410548 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

14. In vitro and in vivo antiviral activity of scopadulcic acid B from Scoparia dulcis, Scrophulariaceae, against herpes simplex virus type 1.
Hayashi K, Niwayama S, Hayashi T, Nago R, Ochiai H, Morita N.
Department of Virology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sugitani, Japan.
Antiviral Res. 1988 Sep;9(6):345-54
The antiviral activity of five diterpenoids isolated from Scoparia dulcis L., Scrophulariaceae, was examined in vitro against herpes simplex virus type 1. Among these compounds, only scopadulcic acid B was found to inhibit the viral replication with the in vitro therapeutic index of 16.7. The action of scopadulcic acid B was not due to a direct virucidal effect or inhibition of virus attachment to host cells. Single-cycle replication experiments indicated that the compound interfered with considerably early events of virus growth. The influence of scopadulcic acid B on the course of the primary corneal herpes simplex virus infection was investigated by means of a hamster test model. When the treatment was initiated immediately after virus inoculation, scopadulcic acid B, when applied orally or intraperitoneally, effectively prolonged both the appearance of herpetic lesions and the survival time at the dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg per day.
PMID2852487 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Additional Information

Manufacturer Amazon Therapeutic Labs
SKU HA-VASSOURINHALB
Product Type Cut & Sifted Herbs
Volume 1lb.

Amazon Therapeutic Labs

The HERBS AMERICA COMPANY and MACA MAGIC were founded by Jerome River Black. He was the first to cultivate and distribute live maca root plants in the USA and began germplasm collections and cultivar selection of maca in the Peruvian Altiplano in 1994. In addition to his studies of maca in the Peruvian highlands, Jerome is a published ethnobotanist with a myriad of expertise and an extensive history of working within a variety of botanical experiences. He has explored remote rivers, lakes, and forests in dozens of exotic countries, his travels having taken him to the depths of steamy jungles and the tops of 20 thousand foot mountains...

He is the award winner of the Natural Foods Institute "Best New Plants" Award and the subject of numerous articles about plant exploration. He regularly lectures and teaches others about new and rare foodcrop development. Jerry currently resides with his family in the lovely rural area of Murphy, Oregon, surrounded by acres of land containing thousands of varrieties of rare plants from around the world.

Over the course of nearly 20 years, HERBS AMERICA'S founders have used USDA agriculture and agro forestry permits to develop more than 400 rare fruits and new superfoods for introduction into the farming sector and natural foods market. To accomplish this HERBS AMERICA works directly with botanists, tribal leaders, universities, and laboratories to cultivate and research traditional medicines which are found to be beneficial for both humans and the land. Our goal is to bring equitability to small farming operations in developing countries and support indigenous populations in their efforts of preserving culture and environment while at the same time supporting agrarian economies. Working in more than thirty countries around the world, the company donates and exports fruit trees and vegetable seeds to dozens of farmers in countries on several continents.

Our long term philosopy commits us to our product lines long after they leave the farms and jungles. We like to say: "Eat well! Think well! Live close to nature and work for the good of the community!" We believe that traditional wisdom and modern science can combine important resources for a long term vision of biological health. We are adamant in our support of indigenous land rights and sustainable agriculture. A portion of our company's annual budget is designated to help protect natural heritage through conservation projects.

Herbs America Company/ ATL
P.O. Box 411, Murphy, Oregon 
USA - 97533
Tel. +1 541-846-6222
Fax: +1 541-846-9488
http://www.amazonmedicine.com

Important Information

Legal Disclaimer: While we work to ensure that product information is correct, on occasion manufacturers may alter their ingredient lists. Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and/or different information than that shown on our Web site. We recommend that you do not solely rely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product. For additional information about a product, please contact the manufacturer. Content on this site is for reference purposes and is not intended to substitute for advice given by a physician, pharmacist, or other licensed health-care professional. You should not use this information as self-diagnosis or for treating a health problem or disease. Contact your health-care provider immediately if you suspect that you have a medical problem. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or health condition. Nature's Alternatives assumes no liability for inaccuracies or misstatements about products.

Product Questions

No questions yet. Be the first to ask a question!

Product Tags

Add your tags

Use spaces to separate tags. Use single quotes (') for phrases.