Amazon Therapeutic Labs Yacon Herbal Syrup 1 Liter (33.8 fl. oz.) Certified Organic

Item #: HA-YACONLB

$99.95

Availability: Out of stock

Natural syrup improves digestion and aid detoxification
Organic No Animal Testing Non Irradiated. No Irradiation. Vegetarian

Frequently Bought Together

Product Description - Amazon Therapeutic Labs Yacon Herbal Syrup 1 Liter (33.8 fl. oz.) Certified Organic

Hoxsey Red Clover Burdock Plus Blood Cleansing Herbal Formula

Yacon Syrup™ Smallanthus sonchifolius

Yacon is a distant relative of the sunflower with edible tubers and leaves. Th syrup from this sweet root is raising eyebrows in the medical community and natural product world for its medicinal qualities. It contains fructooligosaccharides (FOS), which pass through the digestive track unmetabolized, providing few calories1. The sugars, however, are metabolized by the bifidobacteria in the large intestine and contribute to improved digestions and absorption of vitamins, such as B-complex. The undigested portion of yacon serves as prebiotic-food for “friendly” bacteria. Other benefits of FOS supplementation include increased production of beneficial short-chain fatty acids, such as butyrate, increased absorption of calcium and magnesium and improved elimination of toxic compounds. Preclinical studies indicate an increase in bone density after consumption of FOS. It may help diabetics regulate and normalize glucose levels in the blood due to its FOS content. It is considered hypoglycemic and holds promise as a sweetener for diabetics and others who choose not to consume sugar.

Suggested Use Syrup: Use in place of sugar as you would with honey. One quarter teaspoon of Yacon Syrup is equal in sweetness to one teaspoon of sugar or honey. Use on pancakes, hot cereals and for baking. Delicious when added to Qat Tea.

Cautions: None known.

Contraindications: None known.

Ingredients: Yacon syrup (Smallanthus sonchifolius) extracted through steam distiallation.

 

More About Yacon Syrup:


1. Andean yacon root (Smallanthus sonchifolius Poepp. Endl) fructooligosaccharides as a potential novel source of prebiotics.
Pedreschi R, Campos D, Noratto G, Chirinos R, Cisneros-Zevallos L.
Department of Horticultural Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA.
J Agric Food Chem. 2003 Aug 27;51(18):5278-84.
PMID: 12926870 [PubMed]indexed for Medline]
2. Smallanthus sonchifolius and Lepidium meyenii - prospective Andean crops for the prevention of chronic diseases.
Valentova K, Ulrichova J.
Institute of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Hnevotinska 3, Olomouc, 775 15, Czech Republic.
Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub. 2003 Dec;147(2):119-30.
PMID: 15037892 [PubMed - in process]
3. Comparison of three different solid-phase microextraction fibres for analysis of essential oils in yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) leaves.
Adam M, Juklova M, Bajer T, Eisner A, Ventura K.
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, nam. Cs. legii 565, 532 10 Pardubice, Czech Republic. martin.adam@upce.cz
Publication Types: Validation Studies
PMID: 16114228 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
4. Radical scavenging and anti-lipoperoxidative activities of Smallanthus sonchifolius leaf extracts.
Valentova K, Sersen F, Ulrichova J.
Palacky University, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Hnevotinska 3, CZ-77515 Olomouc, Czech Republic. kata.valentova@email.cz
J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Jul 13;53(14):5577-82.
PMID: 15998117 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
5. Quantitative determination of enhydrin in leaf rinse extracts and in glandular trichomes of Smallanthus sonchifolius (Asteraceae) by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.
Schorr K, Da Costa FB.
Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Av. Bandeirantes, 3900-Bloco Q, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil.
Phytochem Anal. 2005 May-Jun;16(3):161-5.
PMID: 15997848 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
6. Subchronic 4-month oral toxicity study of dried Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon) roots as a diet supplement in rats.
Genta SB, Cabrera WM, Grau A, Sanchez SS.
Departamento de Biologia del Desarrollo, Instituto Superior de Investigaciones Biologicas, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas y Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Chacabuco 461, 4000 San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman, Argentina.
Food Chem Toxicol. 2005 Nov;43(11):1657-65.
PMID: 15979774 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
7. The effect of Smallanthus sonchifolius leaf extracts on rat hepatic metabolism.
Valentova K, Moncion A, de Waziers I, Ulrichova J.
Institute of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. kata.valentova@email.cz
Cell Biol Toxicol. 2004 Mar;20(2):109-20.
PMID: 15242186 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
8. Investigation of phenolic acids in yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) leaves and tubers.
Simonovska B, Vovk I, Andrensek S, Valentova K, Ulrichova J.
National Institute of Chemistry, Laboratory for Food Chemistxry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia. breda.simonovska@ki.si
J Chromatogr A. 2003 Oct 17;1016(1):89-98.
PMID: 14601830 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
9. Purification and identification of antimicrobial sesquiterpene lactones from yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) leaves.
Lin F, Hasegawa M, Kodama O.
Laboratory of Phytochemical Ecology, College of Agriculture, Ibaraki University, Chuo, Ami, Ibaraki, Japan.
Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 2003 Oct;67(10):2154-9.
PMID: 14586103 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
10. Antioxidant activity of extracts from the leaves of Smallanthus sonchifolius.
Valentova K, Cvak L, Muck A, Ulrichova J, Simanek V.
Institute of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Palacky University, Hnevotinska 3, 77515 Olomouc, Czech Republic. dankovak@seznam.cz
Eur J Nutr. 2003 Jan;42(1):61-6.
PMID: 12594543 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
11. Caffeic acid derivatives in the roots of yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius).
Takenaka M, Yan X, Ono H, Yoshida M, Nagata T, Nakanishi T.
National Food Research Institute, 2-1-12 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642, Japan. tknk1221@nfri.affrc.go.jp
J Agric Food Chem. 2003 Jan 29;51(3):793-6.
PMID: 12537459 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
12. Extraction and identification of antioxidants in the roots of yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius).
Yan X, Suzuki M, Ohnishi-Kameyama M, Sada Y, Nakanishi T, Nagata T.
National Food Research Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries, 2-1-2 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642, Japan.
J Agric Food Chem. 1999 Nov;47(11):4711-3.
PMID: 10552877 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
1. Andean yacon root (Smallanthus sonchifolius Poepp. Endl) fructooligosaccharides as a potential novel source of prebiotics.
Pedreschi R, Campos D, Noratto G, Chirinos R, Cisneros-Zevallos L.
Department of Horticultural Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA.
J Agric Food Chem. 2003 Aug 27;51(18):5278-84.
The ability of three known probiotic strains (two lactobacilli and one bifidobacterium) to ferment fructooligosaccharides (FOS) from yacon roots (Smallanthus sonchifolius Poepp. Endl) was compared to commercial FOS in this study. Results indicate that Lactobacillus acidophilus NRRL-1910, Lactobacillus plantarum NRRL B-4496, and Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 15696 were able to ferment yacon root FOS. FOS consumption apparently depended on the degree of polymerization and the initial FOS composition. L. plantarum NRRL B-4496 and L. acidophilus NRRL B-1910 completely utilized 1-kestose molecules, while B. bifidum was able to utilize 1-kestose molecules as well as molecules with a higher degree of polymerization.
PMID: 12926870 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
2. Smallanthus sonchifolius and Lepidium meyenii - prospective Andean crops for the prevention of chronic diseases.
Valentova K, Ulrichova J.
Institute of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Hnevotinska 3, Olomouc, 775 15, Czech Republic.
Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub. 2003 Dec;147(2):119-30.
Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon) and Lepidium meyenii (maca) were the traditional crops of the original population of Peru where they are also still used in folk medicine. These plants are little known in Europe and Northern America although at least yacon can be cultivated in the climatic conditions of these regions. This article deals with the botany and the composition, the structure of main constituents, biological activity of these plants and the cultivation of yacon in the Czech Republic. The potential of yacon tubers to treat hyperglycemia, kidney problems and for skin rejuvenation and the antihyperglycemic and cytoprotective activity of its leaves seems to be related mostly to its oligofructan and phenolic content, respectively. Maca alkaloids, steroids, glucosinolates, isothicyanates and macamides are probably responsible for its aptitude to act as a fertility enhancer, aphrodisiac, adaptogen, immunostimulant, anabolic and to influence hormonal balance. Yacon and maca are already on the European market as prospective functional foods and dietary supplements, mainly for use in certain risk groups of the population, e.g. seniors, diabetics, postmenopausal women etc.
PMID: 15037892 [PubMed - in process]
3. Comparison of three different solid-phase microextraction fibres for analysis of essential oils in yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) leaves.
Adam M, Juklova M, Bajer T, Eisner A, Ventura K.
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, nam. Cs. legii 565, 532 10 Pardubice, Czech Republic. martin.adam@upce.cz
J Chromatogr A. 2005 Aug 19;1084(1-2):2-6.
A headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) procedure based on three commercialised fibers (100 microm polydimethylsiloxane, 65 microm polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene and 50/30 microm divinylbenzene-Carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane) is presented for the determination of a selected essential oils in dried leaves of yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius). The extraction performances of these compounds were compared using fibers with one, two and three coatings. The optimal experimental procedures for the adsorption and desorption of target compounds were determined. Significant parameters affecting sorption process such as sample weight, sorption and desorption time and temperature were optimised and discussed. Finally, the optimised procedures were applied successfully for the determination of these compounds in various yacon species. The relative concentration factors of three characteristic components of yacon were measured for relative evaluation of the fiber efficiency. Main essential oils were isolated from dried yacon leaves by appropriate solid-phase microextraction fiber and semi-quantitative analysis of the target volatiles was conducted by gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) using a capillary column. Three compounds--beta-pinene, caryophylene and y-cadinene were found as the predominant essential oils. Its relative content was important for specification of yacon varieties. Solid-phase microextraction in combination with gas chromatography enabled a rapid and simple determination of relative content of essential oils in yacon.
Publication Types: Validation Studies
PMID: 16114228 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
4. Radical scavenging and anti-lipoperoxidative activities of Smallanthus sonchifolius leaf extracts.
Valentova K, Sersen F, Ulrichova J.
Palacky University, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Hnevotinska 3, CZ-77515 Olomouc, Czech Republic. kata.valentova@email.cz
J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Jul 13;53(14):5577-82.
Radical scavenging and anti-lipoperoxidative effects of two organic fractions and two aqueous extracts from the leaves of a neglected Andean crop-yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius Poepp. & Endl., Asteraceae) were determined using various in vitro models. The extracts total phenolic content was 10.7-24.6%. They exhibited DPPH (IC50 16.14-33.39 microg/mL) and HO* scavenging activities (4.49-6.51 mg/mL). The extracts did not scavenge phenylglyoxylic ketyl radicals, but they retarded their formation. In the xanthine/xanthine oxidase superoxide radical generating system, the extracts activities were 26.10-37.67 superoxide dismutase equivalents/mg. As one of the extracts displayed xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity, the effect of the extracts on a nonenzymatically generated superoxide was determined (IC50 7.36-21.01 microg/mL). The extracts inhibited t-butyl hydroperoxide-induced lipoperoxidation of microsomal and mitochondrial membranes (IC50 22.15-465.3 microg/mL). These results make yacon leaves a good candidate for use as a food supplement in the prevention of chronic diseases involving oxidative stress.
PMID: 15998117 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
5. Quantitative determination of enhydrin in leaf rinse extracts and in glandular trichomes of Smallanthus sonchifolius (Asteraceae) by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.
Schorr K, Da Costa FB.
Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Av. Bandeirantes, 3900-Bloco Q, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil.
Phytochem Anal. 2005 May-Jun;16(3):161-5.
A simple, reliable and rapid reversed-phase HPLC-PAD procedure for the characterisation and quantitative determination of the anti-diabetic sesquiterpene lactone enhydrin (1) from Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon) has been evaluated and validated. The approach focused on the analysis of various leaf rinse extracts, as well as the glandular trichomes of intact leaves, in which 1 was the major compound detected. The best sample preparation of a rinse extract yielded 0.67 mg/mL of 1, whilst a rapid rinse of a small piece of one dried leaf gave 0.09 mg/mL of 1; the highest concentration obtained from a glandular extract was 0.07 mg/mL. The dried leaves of S. sonchifolius were found to contain a total of 0.97% of 1.
PMID: 15997848 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
6. Subchronic 4-month oral toxicity study of dried Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon) roots as a diet supplement in rats.
Genta SB, Cabrera WM, Grau A, Sanchez SS.
Departamento de Biologia del Desarrollo, Instituto Superior de Investigaciones Biologicas, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas y Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Chacabuco 461, 4000 San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman, Argentina.
Food Chem Toxicol. 2005 Nov;43(11):1657-65.
Yacon roots are a rich source of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and have a long use tradition as food in the Andean region. However, there are no published reports regarding their toxicology and use safety. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of subchronic (4-months) oral consumption of dried yacon root flour as a diet supplement using normal Wistar rats. Two daily intake levels were used, equivalent to 340 mg and 6800 mgFOS/body weight, respectively. Yacon administered as a diet supplement was well tolerated and did not produce any negative response, toxicity or adverse nutritional effect at both intake levels used. Yacon root consumption showed no hypoglycemic activity in normal rats and resulted in significantly reduced post-prandial serum triacylglycerol levels in both doses assayed. Conversely, serum cholesterol reduction was not statistically significant. Cecal hypertrophy was observed in rats fed only the high dose. Our results indicating lack of toxicity and a certain beneficial metabolic activity in normal rats warrant further experiments with normal subjects and patients suffering metabolic disorders. They should also be considered when establishing the regulatory framework of this natural product by national health authorities and international trade agencies.
PMID: 15979774 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
7. The effect of Smallanthus sonchifolius leaf extracts on rat hepatic metabolism.
Valentova K, Moncion A, de Waziers I, Ulrichova J.
Institute of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. kata.valentova@email.cz
Cell Biol Toxicol. 2004 Mar;20(2):109-20.
Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon), originating from South America, has become popular in Japan and in New Zealand for its tubers which contain beta-1,2-oligofructans as the main saccharides. The plant is also successfully cultivated in Central Europe in the Czech Republic in particular. Its aerial part is used in Japan and in Brazil as a component in medicinal teas; while aqueous leaf extracts have been studied for their hypoglycemic activity in normal and diabetic rats. We have already demonstrated the high content of phenolic compounds in yacon leaf extracts and their in vitro antioxidant activity. In this paper, we present the effects of two organic fractions and two aqueous extracts from the leaves of S. sonchifolius on rat hepatocyte viability, on oxidative damage induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BH) and allyl alcohol (AA), and on glucose metabolism and their insulin-like effect on the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) mRNA. All the extracts tested exhibited strong protective effect against oxidative damage to rat hepatocyte primary cultures in concentrations ranging from 1 to 1000 microg/ml, reduced hepatic glucose production via gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis at 1000 microg/ml. Moreover, the effects of the organic fractions (200 and 250 microg/ml) and to a lesser extent, the tea infusion (500 microg/ml) on rat CYP2B and CYP2E mRNA expression, were comparable to those observed with insulin. The combination of radical scavenging, cytoprotective and anti-hyperglycemic activity predetermine S. sonchifolius leaves for use in prevention and treatment of chronic diseases involving oxidative stress, particularly diabetes.
PMID: 15242186 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
8. Investigation of phenolic acids in yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) leaves and tubers.
Simonovska B, Vovk I, Andrensek S, Valentova K, Ulrichova J.
National Institute of Chemistry, Laboratory for Food Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia. breda.simonovska@ki.si
J Chromatogr A. 2003 Oct 17;1016(1):89-98.
Thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) screening of crude extracts of dried leaves and tubers of yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius, Asteraceae) and products of acid hydrolysis of tubers on the silica gel HPTLC plates using the developing solvents ethyl acetate-formic acid-water (85:10:15, v/v/v) and n-hexane-ethyl acetate-formic acid (20:19:1, v/v/v) proved the presence of chlorogenic, caffeic and ferulic acid. These phenolic acids were isolated from the crude extract of yacon leaves by preparative TLC, and identified after elution by HPLC/MS, as well as by direct injection of the crude extract into the HPLC/MS system. Acid hydrolysis of tubers released the increased amount of phenolic acids (e.g. caffeic acid and ferulic acid), flavonoid quercetin and an unidentified flavonoid, which was detected by TLC analysis. Ferulic acid, isomers of dicaffeoylquinic acid and still an unidentified derivative of chlorogenic acid (Mr = 562) as constituents of yacon leaves and ferulic acid as constituent of yacon tubers are reported here for the first time. These acids gave significant contribution to the radical scavenging activity detected directly on the TLC plate sprayed with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH).
PMID: 14601830 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
9. Purification and identification of antimicrobial sesquiterpene lactones from yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) leaves.
Lin F, Hasegawa M, Kodama O.
Laboratory of Phytochemical Ecology, College of Agriculture, Ibaraki University, Chuo, Ami, Ibaraki, Japan.
Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 2003 Oct;67(10):2154-9.
The extraction of yacon [Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp. and Endl.) H. Robinson; Asteraceae] leaves and chromatographic separation yielded two new antibacterial melampolide-type sesquiterpene lactones, 8beta-tigloyloxymelampolid-14-oic acid methyl ester and 8beta-methacryloyloxymelampolid-14-oic acid methyl ester, as well as the four known melampolides, sonchifolin, uvedalin, enhydrin and fluctuanin. The newly identified compound, 8beta-methacryloyloxymelampolid-14-oic acid methyl ester, exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis and Pyricularia oryzae, while 8beta-tigloyloxymelampolid-14-oic acid methyl ester showed lower activity. Fluctuanin exhibited the strongest antibacterial activity against B. subtilis among these six sesquiterpene lactones.
PMID: 14586103 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
10. Antioxidant activity of extracts from the leaves of Smallanthus sonchifolius.
Valentova K, Cvak L, Muck A, Ulrichova J, Simanek V.
Institute of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Palacky University, Hnevotinska 3, 77515 Olomouc, Czech Republic. dankovak@seznam.cz
Eur J Nutr. 2003 Jan;42(1):61-6.
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Yacon ( Smallanthus sonchifolius, Asteraceae) is a native Andean plant, cultivated for its tubers throughout South America. The leaves are used in folk medicine as a medicinal tea for hypoglycemia. This paper describes the antioxidant activity of various extracts from S. sonchifolius leaves for their content of phenolic components. METHODS: The dried leaves were extracted in several ways. Two fractions were selected for their high content of phenolic compounds and analyzed by RP-HPLC. The antioxidant activity of these fractions was tested in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and xanthine/XOD superoxide radical scavenging assays, as inhibition of lipoperoxidation of subcellular membranes and as protective activity against oxidative injury of rat hepatocytes in primary cultures. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The presence of protocatechuic (2.5 and 0.12 mg/g), chlorogenic (9.9 and 1.7 mg/g), caffeic (14.7 and 0.09 mg/g) and ferulic (traces) acids were determined in the two fractions. Both fractions showed potent antioxidant activity in DPPH (IC(50) = 16.1 +/- 3.4 and 24.3 +/- 2.7 mg/ml) and xanthine/XOD superoxide radical scavenging (42.0 +/- 20.3 and 34.3 +/- 11.4 SOD equivalents (U/mg)) tests, they inhibited the lipoperoxidation of rat liver subcellular membranes and they protected rat hepatocytes against oxidative injury. Our results may predetermine the use of S. sonchifolius leaves in human diet as a potential remedy in the prevention of chronic diseases caused by radicals, e. g., arteriosclerosis.
PMID: 12594543 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
11. Caffeic acid derivatives in the roots of yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius).
Takenaka M, Yan X, Ono H, Yoshida M, Nagata T, Nakanishi T.
National Food Research Institute, 2-1-12 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642, Japan. tknk1221@nfri.affrc.go.jp
J Agric Food Chem. 2003 Jan 29;51(3):793-6.
Five caffeic acid derivatives were found in the roots of yacon, Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp. and Endl.) H. Robinson, Asteraceae, as the major water-soluble phenolic compounds. The structures of these compounds were determined by analysis of spectroscopic data. Two of these were chlorogenic acid (3-caffeoylquinic acid) and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, common phenolic compounds in plants of the family Asteraceae. Three were esters of caffeic acid with the hydroxy groups of aldaric acid, derived from hexose. The structure of the aldaric moiety was determined by hydrolysis and comparison of NMR spectra with those of standard aldaric acids. The compounds were novel caffeic acid esters of altraric acid: 2,4- or 3,5-dicaffeoylaltraric acid, 2,5-dicaffeoylaltraric acid, and 2,3,5- or 2,4,5-tricaffeoylaltraric acid.
PMID: 12537459 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
12. Extraction and identification of antioxidants in the roots of yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius).
Yan X, Suzuki M, Ohnishi-Kameyama M, Sada Y, Nakanishi T, Nagata T.
National Food Research Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries, 2-1-2 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642, Japan.
J Agric Food Chem. 1999 Nov;47(11):4711-3.
Yacon, Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp. & Endl.) H. Robinson, Asteraceae, an important economic species grown for its juicy tuberous root, is potentially beneficial in the diet to diabetics. The antioxidative activity of yacon root was studied by 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Antioxidants were extracted by methanol and isolated and purified by gel permeation chromatography and preparative reverse-phase HPLC. Two of the major antioxidants were identified as chlorogenic acid and tryptophan by NMR and mass spectrometry.
PMID: 10552877 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Additional Information

Manufacturer Amazon Therapeutic Labs
SKU HA-YACONLB
Product Type Syrups & Sprays
Volume 1 Liter (33.8oz.)
How Many Drops? 1 Liter (33.8 fl. oz.) = 15,419 Drops
How Many Teaspoons? 1 Liter (33.8 fl. oz.) = 202 teaspoons
How Many Tablespoons? 1 Liter (33.8 fl. oz.) = 67 Tablespoons
Has A Dropper? No dropper

Amazon Therapeutic Labs

The HERBS AMERICA COMPANY and MACA MAGIC were founded by Jerome River Black. He was the first to cultivate and distribute live maca root plants in the USA and began germplasm collections and cultivar selection of maca in the Peruvian Altiplano in 1994. In addition to his studies of maca in the Peruvian highlands, Jerome is a published ethnobotanist with a myriad of expertise and an extensive history of working within a variety of botanical experiences. He has explored remote rivers, lakes, and forests in dozens of exotic countries, his travels having taken him to the depths of steamy jungles and the tops of 20 thousand foot mountains...

He is the award winner of the Natural Foods Institute "Best New Plants" Award and the subject of numerous articles about plant exploration. He regularly lectures and teaches others about new and rare foodcrop development. Jerry currently resides with his family in the lovely rural area of Murphy, Oregon, surrounded by acres of land containing thousands of varrieties of rare plants from around the world.

Over the course of nearly 20 years, HERBS AMERICA'S founders have used USDA agriculture and agro forestry permits to develop more than 400 rare fruits and new superfoods for introduction into the farming sector and natural foods market. To accomplish this HERBS AMERICA works directly with botanists, tribal leaders, universities, and laboratories to cultivate and research traditional medicines which are found to be beneficial for both humans and the land. Our goal is to bring equitability to small farming operations in developing countries and support indigenous populations in their efforts of preserving culture and environment while at the same time supporting agrarian economies. Working in more than thirty countries around the world, the company donates and exports fruit trees and vegetable seeds to dozens of farmers in countries on several continents.

Our long term philosopy commits us to our product lines long after they leave the farms and jungles. We like to say: "Eat well! Think well! Live close to nature and work for the good of the community!" We believe that traditional wisdom and modern science can combine important resources for a long term vision of biological health. We are adamant in our support of indigenous land rights and sustainable agriculture. A portion of our company's annual budget is designated to help protect natural heritage through conservation projects.

Herbs America Company/ ATL
P.O. Box 411, Murphy, Oregon 
USA - 97533
Tel. +1 541-846-6222
Fax: +1 541-846-9488
http://www.amazonmedicine.com

Important Information

Legal Disclaimer: While we work to ensure that product information is correct, on occasion manufacturers may alter their ingredient lists. Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and/or different information than that shown on our Web site. We recommend that you do not solely rely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product. For additional information about a product, please contact the manufacturer. Content on this site is for reference purposes and is not intended to substitute for advice given by a physician, pharmacist, or other licensed health-care professional. You should not use this information as self-diagnosis or for treating a health problem or disease. Contact your health-care provider immediately if you suspect that you have a medical problem. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or health condition. Nature's Alternatives assumes no liability for inaccuracies or misstatements about products.

Product Questions

No questions yet. Be the first to ask a question!

Product Tags

Add your tags

Use spaces to separate tags. Use single quotes (') for phrases.