Amazon Therapeutic Labs Codizone Herbal Extract Formula 2 fl. oz.

Item #: HA-CODIZONE2
UPC #: 838451008418

$28.99

Availability:

Herbal Extracts Healing Solutions from the Amazon
Organic No Animal Testing Non Irradiated. No Irradiation. Vegetarian

Product Description - Amazon Therapeutic Labs Codizone Herbal Extract Formula 2 fl. oz.

Hoxsey Red Clover Burdock Plus Blood Cleansing Herbal Formula

Codizone™ To relieve pain and promote relaxation

This proprietary compound consists of analgesic and anti-inflammatory herbs, well known to promote muscle relaxation, and reduce muscle spasms1,2,3,4,5,6,7,9,10,11,12,13,14,15. Combined with stimulating Qat tea™, it increases circulation to the brain and muscles, and has been found effective for headaches.8 Codizone™ is our best selling muscle relaxant and pain reliever.

Suggested Use: Use 20-40 drops mixed with water two to three times daily or as recommended by a practitioner.

Cautions: May cause relaxation and drowsiness. Contains Cats Claw which may boost immune function and potentiate blood thining medications. Contains Qat Tea which may lower blood sugar levels. Contains Vassourinha which may have hypoglycemic effects. Use under care/advice of a medical practitioner. Not intended for long term therapy.

Contraindications: Do not use before or after an organ or bone marrow transplant. Use with caution in combination with barbiturates and antidepressants.

Ingredients: Chu Chu Huasi (Maytenus macrocarpa), Iporuru (Alchornea castaneifolia), Cats Claw (Uncaria tomentosa), Clavo Huasca (Tyanthus panurensis), Qat Tea (Ilex guayusa), Mexican Yam (Dioscorea villosa), Sangre de Grado (Croton lechleri), Nucno Pichana (Scoparia dulcis). Extracted in distilled water and 40% organic grain alcohol.

 

More About Codizone™:

Chu Chu Huasi 'Maytenus macrocarpa'
Used for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties.*
Iporuru 'Alchornea castaneifolia'
Used for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. Used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, colds and muscle pain.*
Cats Claw 'Uncaria tomentosa'
Used for its anti-infalmmatory, and pain releiving properties. Stimulates the immune system and protects cells.*
Clavo Huasca 'Tyanthus panurensis'
Used for its pain releiving properties.*
Qat Tea (say"Cat") 'Ilex guayusa '
Used for its curculatory properties, and to releive headaches.*
Mexican Yam 'Dioscorea villosa'
Used for its anti-inflammatory properties. Used for Menstrual pain, muscle spasms and cramps.*
Sangre de Grado 'Croton lechleri'
Used for its anti-inflammatory properties.*
Vassourinha 'Scoparia dulcis'
Used for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. Reduces spasms, and heals wounds.*

SELECTED STUDIES AND REFERENCES

Chu Chu Huasi Maytenus macrocarpa
1.Chuchuhuasha - a drug used in folk medicine in the Amazonian and Andean areas. A chemical study of Maytenus laevis.
Gonzalez JG; delle Monache G; delle Monache F; Marini-Bettol GB
J Ethnopharmacol, 5: 1, 1982 Jan, 73-7

Iporuru Alchornea castaneifolia
2. Traditional medicinal plant use in Northern Peru: tracking two thousand years of healing culture.
Bussmann RW, Sharon D.
University of Hawaii, Lyon Arboretum, 3860 Manoa Rd,, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA. bussmann@hawaii.edu.
PMID: 17090303 [PubMed - in process]
Cats Claw Uncaria tomentosa
3. Antiinflammatory actions of cats claw: the role of NF-kappaB.
Sandoval-Chacon M, Thompson JH, Zhang XJ, Liu X, Mannick EE, Sadowska-Krowicka H, Charbonnet RM, Clark DA, Miller MJ.
LSU Medical Center, Department of Paediatrics and Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 1998 Dec;12(12):1279-89.
PMID: 9882039 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
4. Antiinflammatory actions of cats claw: the role of NF-kappaB.
Sandoval-Chacon M, Thompson JH, Zhang XJ, Liu X, Mannick EE, Sadowska-Krowicka H, Charbonnet RM, Clark DA, Miller MJ.
LSU Medical Center, Department of Paediatrics and Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 1998 Dec;12(12):1279-89.
PMID: 9882039 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Clavo Huasca Tyanthus panurensis
5. Tynnanthus panurensis (Bur.) Sandw. Bignoniaceae. Clavo huasca, Inejkeu, Clove vine.
http://www.rain-tree.com/clavohuasca.html
6. Ethnobotany of the Peruvian Amazon.
http://www.biopark.org/Plants-Amazon.html
7. RHP Ethnobotanical Dictonary
Tim Woodruff, 1995,

Qat Tea Ilex guayusa
8. Headache Treatments By Native Peoples of theEcuadorian Amazon: A Preliminary Cross Disciplinary Assessment
Ethan B. Russo, M.D.
Deparment of Neurology, Western Montana Clinic, Box 7609, 515 W.Front St., Missoula, MT 59807 (U.S.A.)
Mexican Yam Dioscorea villosa
9. Wild Yam
www.2bnThewild.com-Wildflowers of the Southeastern United States
10. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants
Chevallier, Andrew
DK Publishing, 1996, pg 89

Sangre de Grado Croton lechleri
11. Isolation of a dihydrobenzofuran lignan from South American dragons blood (Croton spp.) as an inhibitor of cell proliferation.
Pieters L, de Bruyne T, Claeys M, Vlietinck A, Calomme M, vanden Berghe D.
University of Antwerp, Belgium.
J Nat Prod. 1993 Jun;56(6):899-906.
PMID: 14598201 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
12. South American plants II: taspine isolation and anti-inflammatory activity.
Perdue GP, Blomster RN, Blake DA, Farnsworth NR.
J Pharm Sci. 1979 Jan;68(1):124-6
PMID: 758452 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
13. Taspine is the cicatrizant principle in Sangre de Grado extracted from Croton lechleri
Vaisberg AJ, Milla M, Planas MC, Cordova JL, de Agusti ER, Ferreyra R, Mustiga MC, Carlin L, Hammond GB.
Planta Med. 1989 Apr;55(2):140-3.

Vassourinha Scoparia dulcis
14. Analgesic activity of a triterpene isolated from Scoparia dulcis L. (Vassourinha).
Freire SM, Torres LM, Roque NF, Souccar C, Lapa AJ.
Departamento de Fisiologia, UFMA, Sao Luis, Brasil.
PMID: 1841990 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
15. Analgesic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory principle from Scoparia dulcis.
Ahmed M, Shikha HA, Sadhu SK, Rahman MT, Datta BK.
Department of Pharmacy, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh. mua@du.bangla.net
Pharmazie. 2001 Aug;56(8):657-60.
PMID: 11534346 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Chu Chu Huasi Maytenus macrocarpa
1. Chuchuhuasha - a drug used in folk medicine in the Amazonian and Andean areas. Achemical study of Maytenus laevis.
Gonzalez JG; delle Monache G; delle Monache F; Marini-Bettol GB
In the high Amazonian basin a plant named chuchuasha, (or chuchuaso) is used in traditional medicine for several purposes in the form of an alcoholic extract. This plant, a Maytenus species, most probably Maytenus laevis, grows in the subandean region of the Amazonian basin (Peru, Ecuador, Colombia). Antitumor and anti-inflammatory properties were recently attributed to the extracts of the root bark of the plant. The composition of the extract of M. laevis from the Putumayo area of Colombia was studied in order to establish the active principle responsible for these activities. The presence of phenoldienones (tingenone, 22-hydroxytingenone), a catechin (4-methyl-(-)-epigallocatechin) and proanthocyanidins (Ouratea-proanthocyanidins A and B) was established. The biological activities of these compounds confirm the properties of the extracts of the plant claimed by traditional medicine.
J Ethnopharmacol, 5: 1, 1982 Jan, 73-7
(The possibility exists that the therapeutic effects for headache may be related to the caffeine content.)

Iporuru Alchornea castaneifolia
2. Traditional medicinal plant use in Northern Peru: tracking two thousand years of healing culture.
Bussmann RW, Sharon D.
University of Hawaii, Lyon Arboretum, 3860 Manoa Rd,, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA. bussmann@hawaii.edu.
ABSTRACT: This paper examines the traditional use of medicinal plants in Northern Peru, with special focus on the Departments of Piura, Lambayeque, La Libertad, Cajamarca, and San Martin.Northern Peru represents the center of the old Central Andean Health Axis, stretching from Ecuador to Bolivia. The roots of traditional healing practices in this region go at least as far back as the Moche period (AC 100-800).Although about 50% of the plants in use reported in the colonial period have disappeared from the popular pharmacopoeia, the plant knowledge of the population is much more extensive than in other parts of the Andean region.510 plant species used for medicinal purposes were collected, identified and their vernacular names, traditional uses and applications recorded. The families best represented were Asteraceae with 69 species, Fabaceae (35), Lamiaceae (25), and Solanaceae (21). Euphorbiaceae had twelve species, and Apiaceae and Poaceae 11 species.The highest number of species was used for the treatment of magical/ritual ailments (207 species), followed by respiratory disorders (95), problems of the urinary tract (85), infections of female organs (66), liver ailments (61), inflammations (59), stomach problems (51) and rheumatism (45).Most of the plants used (83%) were native to Peru. Fresh plants, often collected wild, were used in two thirds of all cases, and the most common applications included the ingestion of herb decoctions or the application of plant material as poultices.
PMID: 17090303 [PubMed - in process]

Cats Claw Uncaria tomentosa
3. Antiinflammatory actions of cats claw: the role of NF-kappaB.
Sandoval-Chacon M, Thompson JH, Zhang XJ, Liu X, Mannick EE, Sadowska-Krowicka H, Charbonnet RM, Clark DA, Miller MJ.
LSU Medical Center, Department of Paediatrics and Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 1998 Dec;12(12):1279-89.
BACKGROUND: Uncaria tomentosa is a vine commonly known as cats claw or una de gato (UG) and is used in traditional Peruvian medicine for the treatment of a wide range of health problems, particularly digestive complaints and arthritis. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine the proposed anti-inflammatory properties of cats claw. Specifically: (i) does a bark extract of cats claw protect against oxidant-induced stress in vitro, and (ii) to determine if UG modifies transcriptionally regulated events. METHODS: Cell death was determined in two cell lines, RAW 264.7 and HT29 in response to peroxynitrite (PN, 300 microM). Gene expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in HT29 cells, direct effects on nitric oxide and peroxynitrite levels, and activation of NF-kappaB in RAW 264.7 cells as influenced by UG were assessed. Chronic intestinal inflammation was induced in rats with indomethacin (7.5 mg/kg), with UG administered orally in the drinking water (5 mg/mL). RESULTS: The administration of UG (100 microg/mL) attenuated (P < 0.05) peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis in HT29 (epithelial) and RAW 264.7 cells (macrophage). Cats claw inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS gene expression, nitrite formation, cell death and inhibited the activation of NF-kappaB. Cats claw markedly attenuated indomethacin-enteritis as evident by reduced myeloperoxidase activity, morphometric damage and liver metallothionein expression. CONCLUSIONS: Cats claw protects cells against oxidative stress and negated the activation of NF-kappaB. These studies provide a mechanistic evidence for the widely held belief that cats claw is an effective anti-inflammatory agent.
PMID: 9882039 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
4. In vitro Effects of Two Extracts and Two Pure Alkaloid Preparations of Uncaria tomentosa on Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.
Winkler C, Wirleitner B, Schroecksnadel K, Schennach H, Mur E, Fuchs D.
Institute of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
Planta Med. 2004 Mar;70(3):205-10.
In the traditional Peruvian medicine, hot aqueous extracts of Uncaria tomentosa have been used for the treatment of a wide range of health problems, particularly digestive complaints and arthritis. Some of the beneficial effects observed in patients two mixtures of tetracyclic and pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids of Uncaria tomentosa were investigated in freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with the mitogens phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) in vitro. Neopterin production and tryptophan degradation were monitored in culture supernatants to determine the effects of the test substances on immunobiochemical pathways induced by interferon-gamma. Compared to unstimulated cells PHA and Con A increased the production of neopterin and degradation of tryptophan (p < 0.01). HCl and ethanol extracts and mixtures of alkaloids of Uncaria tomentosa inhibited both effects in a dose-dependent manner, the lowest effective concentrations of the extracts were 500 - 1000 microg/mL and of the alkaloid mixtures 100 - 175 microg/mL (p < 0.05 and < 0.01). With the highest concentrations of extracts and mixtures complete suppression of mitogen-induced neopterin production and tryptophan degradation was observed. These data demonstrate that Uncaria tomentosa extracts and mixtures of alkaloids modulate the immunobiochemical pathways induced by interferon-gamma. The findings imply a potential application of the extracts as immunoregulators and would be in line

Clavo Huasca Tyanthus panurensis
5. Tynnanthus panurensis (Bur.) Sandw. Bignoniaceae. Clavo huasca, Inejkeu, Clove vine.
Duke, James A and Vasquez, Rodolfo,
The pieces of roots and stems are macerated in aguardiente to make a stimulant liqueur, good for rheumatism (RVM). Resin used for fevers (DAT). Some explorama visitors have used it, effectively, for toothache, being as effective as, and probably chemically similar to clove oil (JAD). Some visitors believe, others disbelieve, that the rays of the cross, steeped in aguardiente, are aphrodisiac, some for females, some for males, some for both. We have no incontrovertible empirical evidence, one way or the other.
Amazonian Ethnobotanical Dictionary, CRC Press, Inc., 1994.
6. Ethnobotany of the Peruvian Amazon.
Clavo huasca is a forest liana vine in the same botanical family as the legendary ayahuasca. The name means clovevine (clavo = clove or nail; huasca = vine) and refers to the rich clove-like scent of the trunk and leaves. Sections of the trunk and stems are macerated in aguardiente (sugar cane liquor), producing a drink said to be an aphrodisiac and an effective treatment for fever and rheumatism. It contains the clove-scented chemical eugenol, which soothes toothache. It is a fundamental component of the famed Amazonian tonics siete raices (seven roots) and veinti uno raices (twenty-one roots). Clavo huasca is comonly sold in the Beln medicinal market in Iquitos, Per.
http://www.biopark.org/Plants-Amazon.html
7. RHP Ethnobotanical Dictonary
Tim Woodruff, 1995,
Clavohuasca
This viny cousin of ayahuasca produces no hallucinations and is good for rheumatism and arthritis when cuttings from the stem are steeped in aguardiente. Also, the root has anaesthetic properties good for tooth pain when sap is squeezed onto the tooth.

Qat Tea Ilex guayusa
8. Headache Treatments By Native Peoples of the Ecuadorian Amazon: A Preliminary Cross-Disciplinary Assessment
Ethan B. Russo, M.D.
Deparment of Neurology, Western Montana Clinic,
Box 7609, 515 W.Front St., Missoula, MT 59807 (U.S.A.)
Headache, specifically migraine, is an extremely frequent and debilitating syndrome with worldwide prevalence, including indigenous cultures of Amazonia. This paper considers headache as perceived within the medical philosophy of 5 Indian tribes of the Ecuadorian Amazon Basin. Their ethnobotanical treatments for headache are examined, along with the limited available biochemical assay data. This information is analyzed by means of an Ethnopharmacology Rating Scale. Suggestions are offered as to methods of biochemical analysis that may be fruitful in assessment of potential clinical headache remedies. Key among these is the screening of ethnobotanical samples for serotonin receptor activity. The potential may exist for the discovery of more effective, less toxic headache drugs, as well as for the development of a new industry for the local economy that could promote conservation of an endangered ecosystem.

Mexican Yam Dioscorea villosa
9. Wild Yam
Native Americans and early herbalist had many uses for this plant including the treatment of many female and child birth related problems. It was also used to treat various gastrointestinal problems, muscle spasms, various painful conditions such as arthritis and rheumatism. There seems to be no scientific evidence of its effectiveness for these conditions. Nonetheless, plants of this genus are valuable to modern medicine. Many of our modern steroids are manufactured from diosgenin extracted from them. Drugs like birth control pills are affordable due to this genus. The steroids in the plant could explain its possible effectiveness in some herbal remedies.
www.2bnThewild.com-Wildflowers of the Southeastern United States
10. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants
Chevallier, Andrew
Dioscorea villosa (Dioscoreaceae)
Antispasmodic, Anti-inflammatory, Antirheumatic, Increaes sweating, Diuretic
DK Publishing, 1996, pg 89

Sangre de Grado 'Croton lechleri'
11. Isolation of a dihydrobenzofuran lignan from South American dragons blood (Croton spp.) as an inhibitor of cell proliferation.
Pieters L, de Bruyne T, Claeys M, Vlietinck A, Calomme M, vanden Berghe D.
University of Antwerp, Belgium.
J Nat Prod. 1993 Jun;56(6):899-906.
Dragons blood is a red viscous latex extracted from the cortex of various Croton spp. (Euphorbiaceae), most complement pathways activities were determined in human serum. Intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and monocytes, and phagocytosis of opsonised fluorescent microspheres were measured by flow cytometry. Free radical scavenging activity was evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Activity on proliferation of murine lymphocytes was also investigated. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity was assayed in vivo by carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema test. Some of the activities were compared with those of the isolated alkaloid taspine. Sangre de drago from Croton lechleri showed immunomodulatory activity. It exhibited a potent inhibitory activity on CP and AP of complement system and inhibited the proliferation of activated T-cells. The latex showed free radical scavenging capacity. Depending on the concentration, it showed antioxidant or prooxidant properties, and stimulated or inhibited the phagocytosis. Moreover, the latex has strong anti-inflammatory activity when administered i. p. Taspine cannot be considered the main responsible for these activities, and other constituents, probably proanthocyanidins, should be also involved.
PMID: 14598201 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
12. South American plants II: taspine isolation and anti-inflammatory activity.
Perdue GP, Blomster RN, Blake DA, Farnsworth NR.
J Pharm Sci. 1979 Jan;68(1):124-6
Croton lechleri L. (Euphorbiaceae), a plant from the Upper Amazon Valley of Peru, yielded the alkaloid taspine. The anti-inflammatory activity of taspine hydrochloride was studied using the carrageenan-induced pedal edema method, the cotton pellet-induced granuloma method, and the adjuvant polyarthritis model.
PMID: 758452 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
13. Taspine is the cicatrizant principle in Sangre de Grado extracted from Croton lechleri.
Vaisberg AJ, Milla M, Planas MC, Cordova JL, de Agusti ER, Ferreyra R, Mustiga MC, Carlin L, Hammond GB.
Planta Med. 1989 Apr;55(2):140-3.
Sangre de Grado extract used by Peruvian natives as a cicatrizant agent, was collected from trees of the species Croton lechleri growing in the Peruvian jungle. The Sangre de Grado was found to contain one alkaloid identified as taspine and which was shown to be the active cicatrizant principle by an in vivo test in mice. This alkaloid exhibited a dose-related cicatrizant effect and an ED50 of 0.375 mg/kg. Experiments with taspine hydrochloride in order to study its mechanism of action in cell culture systems showed that the alkaloid was non-toxic to human foreskin fibroblasts at concentrations below 150 ng/ml and that it had no effect on cell proliferation. On the other hand, taspine hydrochloride was found to increase the migration of human foreskin fibroblasts. This effect on the migration of fibroblasts is probably the mechanism by which Sangre de Grado and taspine hydrochloride accelerate the wound healing process. Using the two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis system, we have been able to show that neither Sangre de Grado nor taspine hydrochloride had carcinogenic or tumour promoter activity after 17 months of treatment.
PMID: 2748730 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Vassourinha Scoparia dulcis
14. Analgesic activity of a triterpene isolated from Scoparia dulcis L. (Vassourinha).
Freire SM, Torres LM, Roque NF, Souccar C, Lapa AJ.
Departamento de Fisiologia, UFMA, Sao Luis, Brasil.
Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of water (WE) and ethanolic (EE) extracts of Scoparia dulcis L. were investigated in rats and mice, and compared to the effects induced by Glutinol, a triterpene isolated by purification of EE. Oral administration (p.o.) of either WE or EE (up to 2 g/kg) did not alter the normal spontaneous activity of mice and rats. The sleeping time induced by sodium pentobarbital (50 mg/kg, i.p.) was prolonged by 2 fold in mice pretreated with 0.5 g/kg EE, p.o. Neither extract altered the tail flick response of mice in immersion test, but previous administration of EE (0.5 g/kg, p.o.) reduced writhings induced by 0.8% acetic acid (0.1 ml/10 g, i.p.) in mice by 47%. EE (0.5 and 1 g/kg, p.o.) inhibited the paw edema induced by carrageenan in rats by respectively 46% and 58% after 2 h, being ineffective on the paw edema induced by dextran. No significant analgesic or anti-edema effects were detected in animals pretreated with WE (1 g/kg, p.o.). Administration of Glutinol (30 mg/kg, p.o.) reduced writhing induced by acetic acid in mice by 40% and the carrageenan induced paw edema in rats by 73%. The results indicate that the analgesic activity of S. dulcis L. may be explained by an anti-inflammatory activity probably related to the triterpene Glutinol.
PMID: 1841990 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
15. Analgesic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory principle from Scoparia dulcis.
Ahmed M, Shikha HA, Sadhu SK, Rahman MT, Datta BK.
Department of Pharmacy, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh. mua@du.bangla.net
Pharmazie. 2001 Aug;56(8):657-60.
Scoparinol, a diterpene, isolated from Scoparia dulcis showed significant analgesic (p < 0.001) and anti-inflammatory activity (p < 0.01) in animals. A sedative action of scoparinol was demonstrated by a marked potentiation of pentobarbital-induced sedation with a significant effect on both onset and duration of sleep (p < 0.05). Measurement of urine volume after administration of scoparinol indicated its significant diuretic action.
PMID: 11534346 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Additional Information

Manufacturer Amazon Therapeutic Labs
SKU HA-CODIZONE2
UPC # 838451008418
Product Type Herbal Extract
Country of Manufacture
How Many Drops? 2 fl. oz. = 900 Drops
How Many Teaspoons? 2 fl. oz. = 12 teaspoons
How Many Tablespoons? 2 fl. oz. = 4 Tablespoons

Amazon Therapeutic Labs

The HERBS AMERICA COMPANY and MACA MAGIC were founded by Jerome River Black. He was the first to cultivate and distribute live maca root plants in the USA and began germplasm collections and cultivar selection of maca in the Peruvian Altiplano in 1994. In addition to his studies of maca in the Peruvian highlands, Jerome is a published ethnobotanist with a myriad of expertise and an extensive history of working within a variety of botanical experiences. He has explored remote rivers, lakes, and forests in dozens of exotic countries, his travels having taken him to the depths of steamy jungles and the tops of 20 thousand foot mountains...

He is the award winner of the Natural Foods Institute "Best New Plants" Award and the subject of numerous articles about plant exploration. He regularly lectures and teaches others about new and rare foodcrop development. Jerry currently resides with his family in the lovely rural area of Murphy, Oregon, surrounded by acres of land containing thousands of varrieties of rare plants from around the world.

Over the course of nearly 20 years, HERBS AMERICA'S founders have used USDA agriculture and agro forestry permits to develop more than 400 rare fruits and new superfoods for introduction into the farming sector and natural foods market. To accomplish this HERBS AMERICA works directly with botanists, tribal leaders, universities, and laboratories to cultivate and research traditional medicines which are found to be beneficial for both humans and the land. Our goal is to bring equitability to small farming operations in developing countries and support indigenous populations in their efforts of preserving culture and environment while at the same time supporting agrarian economies. Working in more than thirty countries around the world, the company donates and exports fruit trees and vegetable seeds to dozens of farmers in countries on several continents.

Our long term philosopy commits us to our product lines long after they leave the farms and jungles. We like to say: "Eat well! Think well! Live close to nature and work for the good of the community!" We believe that traditional wisdom and modern science can combine important resources for a long term vision of biological health. We are adamant in our support of indigenous land rights and sustainable agriculture. A portion of our company's annual budget is designated to help protect natural heritage through conservation projects.

Herbs America Company/ ATL
P.O. Box 411, Murphy, Oregon 
USA - 97533
Tel. +1 541-846-6222
Fax: +1 541-846-9488
http://www.amazonmedicine.com

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