Amazon Therapeutic Labs Catuaba Liquid Extract 1 fl. oz.

Item #: HA-CATUABA1
UPC #: 838451002461

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Herbal Extracts Healing Solutions from the Amazon
Organic No Animal Testing Non Irradiated. No Irradiation. Vegetarian

Product Description - Amazon Therapeutic Labs Catuaba Liquid Extract 1 fl. oz.

Hoxsey Red Clover Burdock Plus Blood Cleansing Herbal Formula

Catuaba Erythroxylum catuaba - also Juniperus brasiliens / Trichilia catigua

Along with Muira Puama, Catuaba is one of the most famed male potency tonics in Brazil. The liquid extracts and infusions of the bark of this small tree are well noted to promote sexual abilities, but difficult to find clinical documentation of this. Many references report that It is used for impotence, agitation, nervousness, poor memory, insomnia, hypochondria. It is most often quoted in literature, said to increase libido in men and women, but is traditionally found to be more effective on men4. Should not be used to excess. Famous Brazilian-made libido tonics. Long used by the Tuipi tribes of Brazilian Amazon and now exported world wide for use, the medium sized tree has moved from the jungle now into onto a world wide stage.

Suggested Use Liquids: Use 15-20 drops mixed with water once or twice daily or as recommended by a practitioner.

Cautions: Use under care/advice of a medical practitioner. Not intended for long term therapy. Do not use high in doses.

Contraindications: Unknown. Do not use to excess.

Ingredients: Catuaba extractives, extracted in distilled water and 40% organic grain alcohol.

 

More About Catuaba:

1. The relaxation of isolated rabbit corpus cavernosum* by the herbal medicine Catuama and its constituents.
Antunes E, Gordo WM, de Oliveira JF, Teixeira CE, Hyslop S, De Nucci G.
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6111, 13081-970, Campinas (SP), Brazil. eantunes@bestway.com.br
Phytother Res. 2001 Aug;15(5):416-21.
PMID11507734 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
*NoteCorpus cavernosumSpongy erectile tissue of the penis

2. Clinical toxicology study of an herbal medicinal extract of Paullinia cupana, Trichilia catigua, Ptychopetalum olacoides and Zingiber officinale (Catuama) in healthy volunteers.
Oliveira CH, Moraes ME, Moraes MO, Bezerra FA, Abib E, De Nucci G.
Miguel Servet Clinical Pharmacology Unit, 415 Jesuino Marcondes Machado Avenue, Campinas, SP 13092-320, Brazil. oliveira_ch@terra.com.br
PMID15798997 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. Antidepressant-like effects of Trichilia catigua (Catuaba) extractevidence for dopaminergic-mediated mechanisms.
Campos MM, Fernandes ES, Ferreira J, Santos AR, Calixto JB.
Department of Pharmacology, Center of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario, 88049-900 Florianopolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2005 Oct;182(1):45-53. Epub 2005 Sep 29.
PMID15991001 [PubMed - in process]

4. Amazon Medicines of Brazil, Columbia, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador
by J. River Jones,
Amazon Therapeutic Laboratories,
unpublished field journals 1994-2005.

5. Effects of Catuaba extracts on microbial and HIV infection.
Manabe H, Sakagami H, Ishizone H, Kusano H, Fujimaki M, Wada C, Komatsu N, Nakashima H, Murakami T, Yamamoto N.
Horiuchi Itaro & Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan.
In Vivo. 1992 Mar-Apr;6(2):161-5.
PMID1525337 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6. Methylpyrrole tropane alkaloids from the bark of Erythroxylum vacciniifolium.
Zanolari B, Guilet D, Marston A, Queiroz EF, Paulo Mde Q, Hostettmann K.
Laboratory of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland.
J Nat Prod. 2005 Aug;68(8):1153-8.
PMID16124752 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7. On-line identification of tropane alkaloids from Erythroxylum vacciniifolium by liquid chromatography-UV detection-multiple mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.
Zanolari B, Wolfender JL, Guilet D, Marston A, Queiroz EF, Paulo MQ, Hostettmann K.
Institut de Pharmacognosie et Phytochimie, Universite de Lausanne, BEP, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
J Chromatogr A. 2003 Dec 5;1020(1):75-89.
PMID14661759 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8. Tropane alkaloids from the bark of Erythroxylum vacciniifolium.
Zanolari B, Guilet D, Marston A, Queiroz EF, Paulo Mde Q, Hostettmann K.
Institut de Pharmacognosie et Phytochimie, Universite de Lausanne, BEP, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
J Nat Prod. 2003 Apr;66(4):497-502.
PMID12713400 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9. Two epimeric flavalignans from Trichilia catigua* (Meliaceae) with antimicrobial activity.
Pizzolatti MG, Venson AF, Smania A Jr, Smania Ede F, Braz-Filho R.
Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis-SC, Brazil. moacir@qmc.ufsc.br
PMID12132689 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
*NoteTrichilia catigua Brazilian NameCatuaba

10. Inhibition of platelet phospholipase A2 activity by catuaba extract suggests antiinflammatory properties.
Barbosa NR, Fischmann L, Talib LL, Gattaz WF.
Laboratory of Neuroscience, Department and Institute of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Phytother Res. 2004 Nov;18(11):942-4.
PMID15597313 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

11. Morphological, chemical and functional analysis of catuaba preparations.
Kletter C, Glasl S, Presser A, Werner I, Reznicek G, Narantuya S, Cellek S, Haslinger E, Jurenitsch J.
Institute of Pharmacognosy, University of Vienna, PharmaCenterVienna, Vienna, Austria. Christa.Kletter@univie.ac.at
Planta Med. 2004 Oct;70(10):993-1000.
PMID15490329 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

12. Minor gamma-lactones from Trichilia catigua (Meliaceae) and its precursors by GC-MS.
Pizzolatti MG, Verdi LG, Brighente IM, Madureira LA, Braz Filho R.
Department de Quimica, Laboratorio de Quimica de Produtos Naturais, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis-SC, Brazil. mgpizzo@qmc.ufsc.br
Nat Prod Res. 2004 Oct;18(5):433-8.
PMID15248611 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

13. Inhibition of platelet phospholipase A2 activity by catuaba extract suggests antiinflammatory properties.
Barbosa NR, Fischmann L, Talib LL, Gattaz WF.
Laboratory of Neuroscience, Department and Institute of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Phytother Res. 2004 Nov;18(11):942-4.
PMID15597313 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

1. The relaxation of isolated rabbit corpus cavernosum* by the herbal medicine Catuama and its constituents.
Antunes E, Gordo WM, de Oliveira JF, Teixeira CE, Hyslop S, De Nucci G.
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6111, 13081-970, Campinas (SP), Brazil. eantunes@bestway.com.br
Phytother Res. 2001 Aug;15(5):416-21.
The effects of the Brazilian herbal medicine Catuama and each of its plant constituents (Paullinia cupana, Trichilia catigua, Zingiber officinalis and Ptychopetalum olacoides) were investigated on rabbit corpus cavernosum (RbCC) using a bioassay cascade. Catuama caused short-lived and dose-dependent relaxations (11% +/- 7%, 26% +/- 5% and 82% +/- 9%, at doses of 1, 3 and 10 mg, respectively). Neither the nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10 microM) nor the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ (10 microM) significantly affected the Catuama-induced relaxations. Similarly, the selective ATP-dependent K(+) channel (K(ATP)) blocker glibenclamide (10 microM), the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (1 microM) and the voltage-dependent Na(+) channel blocker tetrodotoxin (1 microM) all failed to affect significantly the Catuama-induced relaxations. These results indicate that the relaxations induced by Catuama involve neither nitric oxide release nor K(ATP) channel activation. The extracts of P. cupana, Z. officinalis and P. olacoides caused short-lived and dose-dependent RbCC relaxations, whereas T. catigua evoked long-lasting relaxations which were occasionally preceded by a brief contractile effect. The extract of P. cupana was the most active in relaxing RbCC strips. The relaxations induced by all extracts were not significantly affected by L-NAME (10 microM). The infusion of ODQ (10 microM) had no significant effect on the P. cupana- and Z. officinalis-induced relaxations but reduced by >50% (p < 0.05) those evoked by P. olacoides and T. catigua. Incubations of RbCC with Catuama(10 mg/mL for 0.25 to 5 min) caused increases of cAMP levels (143% increase at 5 min of incubation). Incubations of RbCC with P. cupana extract (1 mg/mL) increased the cAMP levels by 200% whereas higher doses (10 and 100 mg/mL) caused smaller increases in the nucleotide levels (150% and 89%, respectively). The extracts of Z. officinalis and P. olacoides (same doses) caused smaller increases of the cAMP levels compared with the P. cupana extract, whereas T. catigua (1-100 mg) did not increase the levels of this nucleotide above the basal values. Our results show that of the four extracts assayed, P. cupana was the most effective, indicating that it is the main extract responsible for the relaxing effect of Catuama on rabbit cavernosal tissue. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PMID11507734 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
*NoteCorpus cavernosumis one of a pair of a sponge-like regions of erectile tissue which contain most of the blood in the male penis during erection. There are corresponding structures and functions in the female clitoris. The term literally means cave-like body (pluralcorpora cavernosa).

2. Clinical toxicology study of an herbal medicinal extract of Paullinia cupana, Trichilia catigua, Ptychopetalum olacoides and Zingiber officinale (Catuama) in healthy volunteers.
Oliveira CH, Moraes ME, Moraes MO, Bezerra FA, Abib E, De Nucci G.
Miguel Servet Clinical Pharmacology Unit, 415 Jesuino Marcondes Machado Avenue, Campinas, SP 13092-320, Brazil. oliveira_ch@terra.com.br
In Brazil, a herbal medicinal extract named Catuama containing a mixture of Paullinia cupana (guarana; Sapindaceae), Trichilia catigua (catuaba; Meliaceae), Ptychopetalum olacoides (muirapuama; Olacaceae) and Zingiber officinale (ginger; Zingiberaceae) is used as a body stimulant, energetic, tonic and aphrodisiac. The present study investigated the chronic administration of 25 mL Catuama twice a day during 28 days for any toxic effect on healthy human volunteers of both sexes. No severe adverse reactions or haematological and biochemical changes were reported. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PMID15798997 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. Antidepressant-like effects of Trichilia catigua (Catuaba) extractevidence for dopaminergic-mediated mechanisms.
Campos MM, Fernandes ES, Ferreira J, Santos AR, Calixto JB.
Department of Pharmacology, Center of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario, 88049-900 Florianopolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2005 Oct;182(1):45-53. Epub 2005 Sep 29.
RATIONALECurrently available therapy for depression treatment is often associated with several undesirable side effects, and it is effective only in a certain portion of the population. Therefore, the identification of alternative therapeutic tools for the treatment of depression is still needed. OBJECTIVEThe present study analyzed the possible antidepressant-like effects of the Brazilian medicinal plant, Trichilia catigua, in rodents. Attempts were also made to investigate some of the possible mechanisms implicated in its actions. METHODSThe antidepressant-like effects of T. catigua extract were assessed in two species of rodents (mice and rats) by means of in vivo (forced swimming test) and in vitro (monoamine reuptake and release in synaptosomal preparations) approaches. RESULTSAcute oral treatment with the extract of T. catigua produced antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming model in both mice and rats. Anti-immobility actions of T. catigua extract in mice were significantly reversed by haloperidol or by chlorpromazine, but not by pimozide, ketanserin, spiroxatrine or p-chlorophenylalanine. In vitro, T. catigua extract concentration-dependently inhibited the uptake and increased the release of serotonin, and especially of dopamine, from rat brain synaptosomal preparations. CONCLUSIONSThe present study provides convincing evidence for a dopamine-mediated antidepressant-like effect of the active principle(s) present in the hydroalcoholic extract of T. catigua in mice and rats when in vivo and in vitro strategies were employed. Therefore, a standardized T. catigua extract or its purified constituents could be of potential interest for the treatment of depressive disorders.
PMID15991001 [PubMed - in process]

4. Amazon Medicines of Brazil, Columbia, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador
by J. River Jones,
Amazon Therapeutic Laboratories,
unpublished field journals 1994-2005.

5. Effects of Catuaba extracts on microbial and HIV infection.
Manabe H, Sakagami H, Ishizone H, Kusano H, Fujimaki M, Wada C, Komatsu N, Nakashima H, Murakami T, Yamamoto N.
Horiuchi Itaro & Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan.
In Vivo. 1992 Mar-Apr;6(2):161-5.
Pretreatment of mice with hot water and alkaline extracts of Catuaba casca (Erythroxylum catuaba Arr. Cam.) effectively protected them from lethal infection of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The extracts significantly inhibited both the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced cytopathic effect and the expression of HIV antigen in HIV-1HTLV-IIIB or HIV-2ROD infected human lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1) positive MT-4 cells. The 50% effective concentrations of the active fractions (21-263 micrograms/ml) were 1/4 - 1/43 of their 50% cytotoxic concentrations. Their anti-HIV activity was shown to be induced, at least in part, via the inhibition of HIV adsorption to the cells. The data suggest a medicinal potential of Catuaba extracts against opportunistic infection in HIV patients.
PMID1525337 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6. Methylpyrrole tropane alkaloids from the bark of Erythroxylum vacciniifolium.
Zanolari B, Guilet D, Marston A, Queiroz EF, Paulo Mde Q, Hostettmann K.
Laboratory of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland.
J Nat Prod. 2005 Aug;68(8):1153-8.
Nine new tropane alkaloids substituted by a methylpyrrole moiety were isolated from the bark of Erythroxylum vacciniifolium, a Brazilian endemic plant used in traditional medicine and locally known as catuaba. All compounds were elucidated as tropanediol or -triol alkaloids esterified by at least one 1-methyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. One of the isolated compounds was identified as a tropane alkaloid N-oxide. Their structures were determined by high-resolution mass spectrometry and multidimensional NMR spectroscopy.
PMID16124752 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7. On-line identification of tropane alkaloids from Erythroxylum vacciniifolium by liquid chromatography-UV detection-multiple mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.
Zanolari B, Wolfender JL, Guilet D, Marston A, Queiroz EF, Paulo MQ, Hostettmann K.
Institut de Pharmacognosie et Phytochimie, Universite de Lausanne, BEP, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
J Chromatogr A. 2003 Dec 5;1020(1):75-89.
The bark of catuaba (Erythroxylum vacciniifolium Martius, Erythroxylaceae), a tree native to the northern part of Brazil, was investigated for its alkaloid content. With the aim of obtaining preliminary structure information on-line, the alkaloid extract was analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array UV detection, to mass spectrometry and to nuclear magnetic resonance. Interpretation of on-line spectroscopic data obtained from this extract led to structural elucidation of six new alkaloids and partial identification of 18 potentially original alkaloids bearing the same tropane skeleton esterified in positions 3 and 6 by 1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-carboxylic acid and/or 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoic acid.
PMID14661759 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8. Tropane alkaloids from the bark of Erythroxylum vacciniifolium.
Zanolari B, Guilet D, Marston A, Queiroz EF, Paulo Mde Q, Hostettmann K.
Institut de Pharmacognosie et Phytochimie, Universite de Lausanne, BEP, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
J Nat Prod. 2003 Apr;66(4):497-502.
Eight new tropane alkaloids (1-8) were isolated from the bark of catuaba, a Brazilian endemic plant Erythroxylum vacciniifolium Martius. Their structures were determined by high-resolution mass spectrometry and multidimensional NMR spectroscopy.
PMID12713400 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9. Two epimeric flavalignans from Trichilia catigua (Meliaceae) with antimicrobial activity.
Pizzolatti MG, Venson AF, Smania A Jr, Smania Ede F, Braz-Filho R.
Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis-SC, Brazil. moacir@qmc.ufsc.br
A mixture of flavalignan cinchonains Ia and Ib was isolated from the bark ofTrichilia catigua. The structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic data of the natural products and their methylated derivatives including 2D NMR experiments, and compared with data in the literature. These flavalignans exhibited antibacterial activity against Bacillus
PMID12132689 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
NoteTrichilia catigua Brazilian NameCatuaba

10. Antidepressant-like effects of Trichilia catigua (Catuaba) extractevidence for dopaminergic-mediated mechanisms.
Campos MM, Fernandes ES, Ferreira J, Santos AR, Calixto JB.
Department of Pharmacology, Center of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario, 88049-900 Florianopolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2005 Oct;182(1):45-53. Epub 2005 Sep 29.
RATIONALECurrently available therapy for depression treatment is often associated with several undesirable side effects, and it is effective only in a certain portion of the population. Therefore, the identification of alternative therapeutic tools for the treatment of depression is still needed. OBJECTIVEThe present study analyzed the possible antidepressant-like effects of the Brazilian medicinal plant, Trichilia catigua, in rodents. Attempts were also made to investigate some of the possible mechanisms implicated in its actions. METHODSThe antidepressant-like effects of T. catigua extract were assessed in two species of rodents (mice and rats) by means of in vivo (forced swimming test) and in vitro (monoamine reuptake and release in synaptosomal preparations) approaches. RESULTSAcute oral treatment with the extract of T. catigua produced antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming model in both mice and rats. Anti-immobility actions of T. catigua extract in mice were significantly reversed by haloperidol or by chlorpromazine, but not by pimozide, ketanserin, spiroxatrine or p-chlorophenylalanine. In vitro, T. catigua extract concentration-dependently inhibited the uptake and increased the release of serotonin, and especially of dopamine, from rat brain synaptosomal preparations. CONCLUSIONSThe present study provides convincing evidence for a dopamine-mediated antidepressant-like effect of the active principle(s) present in the hydroalcoholic extract of T. catigua in mice and rats when in vivo and in vitro strategies were employed. Therefore, a standardized T. catigua extract or its purified constituents could be of potential interest for the treatment of depressive disorders.
PMID15991001 [PubMed - in process]

11. Morphological, chemical and functional analysis of catuaba preparations.
Kletter C, Glasl S, Presser A, Werner I, Reznicek G, Narantuya S, Cellek S, Haslinger E, Jurenitsch J.
Institute of Pharmacognosy, University of Vienna, PharmaCenterVienna, Vienna, Austria. Christa.Kletter@univie.ac.at
Planta Med. 2004 Oct;70(10):993-1000.
Fourteen commercial samples of the popular Brazilian aphrodisiac Catuaba specified as bark drugs of Anemopaegma, Erythroxylum and Trichilia species were examined for identity and purity. Only a minority of the examined Catuaba samples contained the crude drugs claimed on the labels. More than half of the products were adulterated with different crude drugs. The majority of the samples contained a bark originating from Trichilia catigua. The TLC fingerprints confirmed the heterogeneity, in 50% of the samples tropane alkaloids of various concentrations were detected. TLC and HPLC methods for separation and identification of the tropane alkaloids were developed and their analytical data (RF values, retention times, ESI-MS) given. The structure elucidation of the two main alkaloids, catuabine D and its hydroxymethyl derivative, is presented. The 1H- and 13C-NMR assignments of these alkaloids are discussed with regard to literature data. Neither aqueous nor methanolic extracts of the Trichilia catigua reference material nor alkaloid-enriched fractions of commercial samples showed any effect on the rabbit corpus cavernosum in an in vitro test.
PMID15490329 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

NoteTLCThin-layer chromatography is the chromatographic technique for separating and analysing mixtures of substances, using a thin layer of stationary phase attached to a glass plate and using the passage of liquid up the plate by capillary action as the mobile phase. Cis-Trans Isomerism As well as the structural isomerism, which was illustrated in the alkane series, a new type of isomerism is possible in the alkene series

12. Minor gamma-lactones from Trichilia catigua (Meliaceae) and its precursors by GC-MS.
Pizzolatti MG, Verdi LG, Brighente IM, Madureira LA, Braz Filho R.
Department de Quimica, Laboratorio de Quimica de Produtos Naturais, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis-SC, Brazil. mgpizzo@qmc.ufsc.br
Nat Prod Res. 2004 Oct;18(5):433-8.
NMR and GC-MS analysis of fractions of the CHCl3 extract of Trichilia catigua bark led to the identification of a mixture of three omega-phenyl alkanes, three omega-phenyl alkanoic acids, five omega-phenyl-gamma-lactones, two alkyl-gamma-lactones, one alkenyl-gamma-lactone and a mixture of fatty acids ranging from C-14 to C-26. Beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol and campesterol as free alcohols were also identified.
PMID15248611 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

13. Inhibition of platelet phospholipase A2 activity by catuaba extract suggests antiinflammatory properties.
Barbosa NR, Fischmann L, Talib LL, Gattaz WF.
Laboratory of Neuroscience, Department and Institute of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Phytother Res. 2004 Nov;18(11):942-4.
In the inflammation process, phospholipase A2 (PLA2) catalyses the cleavage of the sn-2 ester-linked fatty acids from phospholipids, being the enzyme responsible for arachidonic acid (AA) release by cells for the biosynthesis of the prostaglandins and thromboxanes via the cyclooxygenase system, and the leukotrienes and eicosatetraenoids via the lipoxygenase pathway. AA mobilization by PLA2 and subsequent prostaglandins synthesis is considered to be a pivotal event in inflammation. Therefore, drugs that inhibit PLA2, thus blocking the COX and LOX pathways in the AA cascade, may be effective in the treatment of inflammatory processes. New strategies for the treatment of inflammatory processes could be detected by a search for active principles of vegetal origin that control the lipid mediator production by inhibition of PLA2. The present data are part of a wide explorative investigation on the effects of Trichilia catigua (catuaba), which found that PLA2 activity was totally inhibited by catuaba at a concentration of 120 microg/mL, suggesting that this natural substance may have antiinflammatory properties. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PMID15597313 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

DisclaimerStatements on this page have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Information on this publication should not be used as medical advice. Data prvided for research and professional use only.

Additional Information

Manufacturer Amazon Therapeutic Labs
SKU HA-CATUABA1
UPC # 838451002461
Product Type Herbal Extract
Volume 1 oz.
Country of Manufacture
How Many Drops? 1 fl. oz. = 450 Drops
How Many Teaspoons? 1 fl. oz. = 6 teaspoons
How Many Tablespoons? 1 fl. oz. = 2 Tablespoons

Amazon Therapeutic Labs

The HERBS AMERICA COMPANY and MACA MAGIC were founded by Jerome River Black. He was the first to cultivate and distribute live maca root plants in the USA and began germplasm collections and cultivar selection of maca in the Peruvian Altiplano in 1994. In addition to his studies of maca in the Peruvian highlands, Jerome is a published ethnobotanist with a myriad of expertise and an extensive history of working within a variety of botanical experiences. He has explored remote rivers, lakes, and forests in dozens of exotic countries, his travels having taken him to the depths of steamy jungles and the tops of 20 thousand foot mountains...

He is the award winner of the Natural Foods Institute "Best New Plants" Award and the subject of numerous articles about plant exploration. He regularly lectures and teaches others about new and rare foodcrop development. Jerry currently resides with his family in the lovely rural area of Murphy, Oregon, surrounded by acres of land containing thousands of varrieties of rare plants from around the world.

Over the course of nearly 20 years, HERBS AMERICA'S founders have used USDA agriculture and agro forestry permits to develop more than 400 rare fruits and new superfoods for introduction into the farming sector and natural foods market. To accomplish this HERBS AMERICA works directly with botanists, tribal leaders, universities, and laboratories to cultivate and research traditional medicines which are found to be beneficial for both humans and the land. Our goal is to bring equitability to small farming operations in developing countries and support indigenous populations in their efforts of preserving culture and environment while at the same time supporting agrarian economies. Working in more than thirty countries around the world, the company donates and exports fruit trees and vegetable seeds to dozens of farmers in countries on several continents.

Our long term philosopy commits us to our product lines long after they leave the farms and jungles. We like to say: "Eat well! Think well! Live close to nature and work for the good of the community!" We believe that traditional wisdom and modern science can combine important resources for a long term vision of biological health. We are adamant in our support of indigenous land rights and sustainable agriculture. A portion of our company's annual budget is designated to help protect natural heritage through conservation projects.

Herbs America Company/ ATL
P.O. Box 411, Murphy, Oregon 
USA - 97533
Tel. +1 541-846-6222
Fax: +1 541-846-9488
http://www.amazonmedicine.com

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